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A comparison of the illness beliefs of people with angina and their peers: a questionnaire study.

Furze G, Roebuck A, Bull P, Lewin RJ, Thompson DR - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2002)

Bottom Line: It has been suggested that such beliefs stem from those commonly held within society.Peers were also more likely to believe that people with angina should take life easy (p < 0.01) and avoid exercise (p = 0.04) and excitement (p < 0.01).Over time this may contribute to a reduction in patient concordance with risk factor reduction, and may help to create cardiac invalids.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: British Heart Foundation Rehabilitation Research Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, UK. gf107@york.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: What people believe about their illness may affect how they cope with it. It has been suggested that such beliefs stem from those commonly held within society. This study compared the beliefs held by people with angina, regarding causation and coping in angina, with the beliefs of their friends who do not suffer from angina.

Methods: Postal survey using the York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1), which elicits stress attributions and misconceived beliefs about causation and coping. This was administered to 164 people with angina and their non-cohabiting friends matched for age and sex. 132 people with angina and 94 friends completed the questionnaire.

Results: Peers are more likely than people with angina to believe that angina is caused by a worn out heart (p < 0.01), angina is a small heart attack (p = 0.02), and that it causes permanent damage to the heart (p < 0.001). Peers were also more likely to believe that people with angina should take life easy (p < 0.01) and avoid exercise (p = 0.04) and excitement (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: The beliefs of the peer group about causation and coping in angina run counter to professional advice. Over time this may contribute to a reduction in patient concordance with risk factor reduction, and may help to create cardiac invalids.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1)
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Figure 1: The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1)

Mentions: The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire version 1 (Fig 1) is designed to elicit beliefs about causation and coping in angina that are misconceived or potentially maladaptive. It consists of 16 statements about angina with answers scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree), with "I don't have any idea about this" scoring 2. The score range for the total questionnaire is from 0 to 64. One month test – retest for scale stability among the sample was satisfactory (Pearson's r = .87, p = 0.0005), and alpha score of internal reliability was acceptable at .803.


A comparison of the illness beliefs of people with angina and their peers: a questionnaire study.

Furze G, Roebuck A, Bull P, Lewin RJ, Thompson DR - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2002)

The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC88998&req=5

Figure 1: The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1)
Mentions: The York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire version 1 (Fig 1) is designed to elicit beliefs about causation and coping in angina that are misconceived or potentially maladaptive. It consists of 16 statements about angina with answers scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree), with "I don't have any idea about this" scoring 2. The score range for the total questionnaire is from 0 to 64. One month test – retest for scale stability among the sample was satisfactory (Pearson's r = .87, p = 0.0005), and alpha score of internal reliability was acceptable at .803.

Bottom Line: It has been suggested that such beliefs stem from those commonly held within society.Peers were also more likely to believe that people with angina should take life easy (p < 0.01) and avoid exercise (p = 0.04) and excitement (p < 0.01).Over time this may contribute to a reduction in patient concordance with risk factor reduction, and may help to create cardiac invalids.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: British Heart Foundation Rehabilitation Research Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, UK. gf107@york.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: What people believe about their illness may affect how they cope with it. It has been suggested that such beliefs stem from those commonly held within society. This study compared the beliefs held by people with angina, regarding causation and coping in angina, with the beliefs of their friends who do not suffer from angina.

Methods: Postal survey using the York Angina Beliefs Questionnaire (version 1), which elicits stress attributions and misconceived beliefs about causation and coping. This was administered to 164 people with angina and their non-cohabiting friends matched for age and sex. 132 people with angina and 94 friends completed the questionnaire.

Results: Peers are more likely than people with angina to believe that angina is caused by a worn out heart (p < 0.01), angina is a small heart attack (p = 0.02), and that it causes permanent damage to the heart (p < 0.001). Peers were also more likely to believe that people with angina should take life easy (p < 0.01) and avoid exercise (p = 0.04) and excitement (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: The beliefs of the peer group about causation and coping in angina run counter to professional advice. Over time this may contribute to a reduction in patient concordance with risk factor reduction, and may help to create cardiac invalids.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus