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Longitudinal impact of a youth tobacco education program.

Mahoney MC, Bauer JE, Tumiel L, McMullen S, Schieder J, Pikuzinski D - BMC Fam Pract (2002)

Bottom Line: Information on the effectiveness of elementary school level, tobacco-use prevention programs is generally limited.It was also found that retention on two knowledge items 'recognition that smokers have yellow teeth and fingers' and 'smoking one pack of cigarettes a day costs several hundred dollars per year' was maintained for four months.Changes in attitudes and knowledge conducive to the goal of tobacco-use prevention can be achieved for short-term retention and some relevant knowledge items can be retained for several months.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14215, USA. martin.mahoney@roswellpark.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Information on the effectiveness of elementary school level, tobacco-use prevention programs is generally limited. This study assessed the impact of a structured, one-time intervention that was designed to modify attitudes and knowledge about tobacco. Participants were fifth-grade students from schools in western New York State.

Methods: Twenty-eight schools, which were in relatively close geographic proximity, were randomized into three groups; Group 1 was used to assess whether attitudes/knowledge were changed in the hypothesized direction by the intervention, and if those changes were retained four months later. Groups 2 and 3, were used as comparison groups to assess possible test-retest bias and historical effects. Groups 1 and 3 were pooled to assess whether attitudes/knowledge were changed by the intervention as measured by an immediate post-test. The non-parametric analytical techniques of Wilcoxon-Matched Pairs/Sign Ranks and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon Rank Sums Tests were used to compare proportions of correct responses at each of the schools.

Results: Pooled analyses showed that short-term retention on most items was achieved. It was also found that retention on two knowledge items 'recognition that smokers have yellow teeth and fingers' and 'smoking one pack of cigarettes a day costs several hundred dollars per year' was maintained for four months.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that inexpensive, one-time interventions for tobacco-use prevention can be of value. Changes in attitudes and knowledge conducive to the goal of tobacco-use prevention can be achieved for short-term retention and some relevant knowledge items can be retained for several months.

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Overview of Tar Wars Evaluation: Western New York State, 1998–1999
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Overview of Tar Wars Evaluation: Western New York State, 1998–1999

Mentions: Responses were also compared among children in other randomly assigned groups (Group 2 and Group 3), who took 'pre-tests', the 'intervention', and 'immediate post-tests', but at different points in time than Group 1 (see Figure 1). Although Groups 2 and 3 can not be considered true control groups, since they also received the educational 'intervention', they are used in this paper, in certain situations, in an attempt to address issues of test-retest bias, (since only one measurement instrument is used for both the 'pre-test' and the 'post-test' surveys), and historical effects, (since other factors besides the 'intervention' may have influenced the outcomes of the 'delayed post-test').


Longitudinal impact of a youth tobacco education program.

Mahoney MC, Bauer JE, Tumiel L, McMullen S, Schieder J, Pikuzinski D - BMC Fam Pract (2002)

Overview of Tar Wars Evaluation: Western New York State, 1998–1999
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC88884&req=5

Figure 1: Overview of Tar Wars Evaluation: Western New York State, 1998–1999
Mentions: Responses were also compared among children in other randomly assigned groups (Group 2 and Group 3), who took 'pre-tests', the 'intervention', and 'immediate post-tests', but at different points in time than Group 1 (see Figure 1). Although Groups 2 and 3 can not be considered true control groups, since they also received the educational 'intervention', they are used in this paper, in certain situations, in an attempt to address issues of test-retest bias, (since only one measurement instrument is used for both the 'pre-test' and the 'post-test' surveys), and historical effects, (since other factors besides the 'intervention' may have influenced the outcomes of the 'delayed post-test').

Bottom Line: Information on the effectiveness of elementary school level, tobacco-use prevention programs is generally limited.It was also found that retention on two knowledge items 'recognition that smokers have yellow teeth and fingers' and 'smoking one pack of cigarettes a day costs several hundred dollars per year' was maintained for four months.Changes in attitudes and knowledge conducive to the goal of tobacco-use prevention can be achieved for short-term retention and some relevant knowledge items can be retained for several months.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14215, USA. martin.mahoney@roswellpark.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Information on the effectiveness of elementary school level, tobacco-use prevention programs is generally limited. This study assessed the impact of a structured, one-time intervention that was designed to modify attitudes and knowledge about tobacco. Participants were fifth-grade students from schools in western New York State.

Methods: Twenty-eight schools, which were in relatively close geographic proximity, were randomized into three groups; Group 1 was used to assess whether attitudes/knowledge were changed in the hypothesized direction by the intervention, and if those changes were retained four months later. Groups 2 and 3, were used as comparison groups to assess possible test-retest bias and historical effects. Groups 1 and 3 were pooled to assess whether attitudes/knowledge were changed by the intervention as measured by an immediate post-test. The non-parametric analytical techniques of Wilcoxon-Matched Pairs/Sign Ranks and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon Rank Sums Tests were used to compare proportions of correct responses at each of the schools.

Results: Pooled analyses showed that short-term retention on most items was achieved. It was also found that retention on two knowledge items 'recognition that smokers have yellow teeth and fingers' and 'smoking one pack of cigarettes a day costs several hundred dollars per year' was maintained for four months.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that inexpensive, one-time interventions for tobacco-use prevention can be of value. Changes in attitudes and knowledge conducive to the goal of tobacco-use prevention can be achieved for short-term retention and some relevant knowledge items can be retained for several months.

Show MeSH