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Breaching the Kinetic Barrier to In Vitro Somatic Stem Cell Propagation.

Merok JR, Sherley JL - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2001)

Bottom Line: Here we have reviewed the conventional definitions and fundamental characteristics of the two basic types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs).By taking into account the often-overlooked asymmetric cell kinetics of SSCs, we consider the evidence that should SSCs retain these growth kinetics in vitro, a natural kinetic barrier to SSC propagation exists.Recent discoveries showing that the tumor suppressor gene p53 can act as a regulator of asymmetric cell kinetics provide a target pathway for in vitro SSC propagation strategies.

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ABSTRACT
Here we have reviewed the conventional definitions and fundamental characteristics of the two basic types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs). By taking into account the often-overlooked asymmetric cell kinetics of SSCs, we consider the evidence that should SSCs retain these growth kinetics in vitro, a natural kinetic barrier to SSC propagation exists. Recent discoveries showing that the tumor suppressor gene p53 can act as a regulator of asymmetric cell kinetics provide a target pathway for in vitro SSC propagation strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ESCs versus SSCs. Two basic type of stem cells exist, the ESC andthe SSC. ESCs are derived from blastocysts and divide with exponential cell kinetics. SSCs, however, are derived from somatic tissues and divide with asymmetric cell kinetics.
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Figure 1: ESCs versus SSCs. Two basic type of stem cells exist, the ESC andthe SSC. ESCs are derived from blastocysts and divide with exponential cell kinetics. SSCs, however, are derived from somatic tissues and divide with asymmetric cell kinetics.

Mentions: Early experiments by cell histologists such as Leblond inferredthe existence of pluripotent progenitor cells, or stemcells [1, 2]. As stem cell research progressed, it becameapparent that there existed two basic types of stem cells(Figure 1). The first, ESCs, are derived fromblastocysts and are sufficiently undifferentiated to allow themto give rise to any adult tissue [3]. This pluripotency canbe seen in the ability of ESCs to be incorporated into developingmouse embryos during transgenic mouse production [4]. The other major type, SSCs, are stem cell populations found inspecific adult tissues that are thought to divide indefinitely with restricted in vivo differentiation capacity [5]. SSC properties have classically been demonstrated by reconstitution of the ablated hematopoietic system of irradiatedmice with a sub-population of bone marrow or fetal liver cells[6].


Breaching the Kinetic Barrier to In Vitro Somatic Stem Cell Propagation.

Merok JR, Sherley JL - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2001)

ESCs versus SSCs. Two basic type of stem cells exist, the ESC andthe SSC. ESCs are derived from blastocysts and divide with exponential cell kinetics. SSCs, however, are derived from somatic tissues and divide with asymmetric cell kinetics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC79674&req=5

Figure 1: ESCs versus SSCs. Two basic type of stem cells exist, the ESC andthe SSC. ESCs are derived from blastocysts and divide with exponential cell kinetics. SSCs, however, are derived from somatic tissues and divide with asymmetric cell kinetics.
Mentions: Early experiments by cell histologists such as Leblond inferredthe existence of pluripotent progenitor cells, or stemcells [1, 2]. As stem cell research progressed, it becameapparent that there existed two basic types of stem cells(Figure 1). The first, ESCs, are derived fromblastocysts and are sufficiently undifferentiated to allow themto give rise to any adult tissue [3]. This pluripotency canbe seen in the ability of ESCs to be incorporated into developingmouse embryos during transgenic mouse production [4]. The other major type, SSCs, are stem cell populations found inspecific adult tissues that are thought to divide indefinitely with restricted in vivo differentiation capacity [5]. SSC properties have classically been demonstrated by reconstitution of the ablated hematopoietic system of irradiatedmice with a sub-population of bone marrow or fetal liver cells[6].

Bottom Line: Here we have reviewed the conventional definitions and fundamental characteristics of the two basic types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs).By taking into account the often-overlooked asymmetric cell kinetics of SSCs, we consider the evidence that should SSCs retain these growth kinetics in vitro, a natural kinetic barrier to SSC propagation exists.Recent discoveries showing that the tumor suppressor gene p53 can act as a regulator of asymmetric cell kinetics provide a target pathway for in vitro SSC propagation strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Here we have reviewed the conventional definitions and fundamental characteristics of the two basic types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs). By taking into account the often-overlooked asymmetric cell kinetics of SSCs, we consider the evidence that should SSCs retain these growth kinetics in vitro, a natural kinetic barrier to SSC propagation exists. Recent discoveries showing that the tumor suppressor gene p53 can act as a regulator of asymmetric cell kinetics provide a target pathway for in vitro SSC propagation strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus