Limits...
The Need for a Well-Organized, Video-Assisted Asthma Education Program at Korean Primary Care Clinics

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of our new video-assisted asthma education program on patients' knowledge regarding asthma and asthma control.

Methods: Adult asthmatics who were diagnosed by primary care physicians and followed for at least 1 year were educated via smart devices and pamphlets. The education sessions were carried out three times at 2-week intervals. Each education period lasted at most 5 minutes. The effectiveness was then evaluated using questionnaires and an asthma control test (ACT).

Results: The study enrolled 144 patients (mean age, 56.7±16.7 years). Half of the patients had not been taught how to use their inhalers. After participating in the education program, the participants' understanding of asthma improved significantly across all six items of a questionnaire assessing their general knowledge of asthma. The proportion of patients who made errors while manipulating their inhalers was reduced to less than 10%. The ACT score increased from 16.6±4.6 to 20.0±3.9 (p<0.001). The number of asthmatics whose ACT score was at least 20 increased from 45 (33.3%) to 93 (65.3%) (p<0.001). The magnitude of improvement in the ACT score did not differ between patients who received an education session at least three times within 1 year and those who had not. The majority of patients agreed to the need for an education program (95.8%) and showed a willingness to pay an additional cost for the education (81.9%).

Conclusion: This study indicated that our newly developed education program would become an effective component of asthma management in primary care clinics.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in the patients' ability to use their inhalers between pre-education and posteducation. “Can do” at each step was defined as a degree of performance that was “good” or “excellent,” while “Can't do” was corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” (A) He(She) can open the lid correctly. (B) He(She) can hold the inhaler(s) properly. (C) He(She) exhales enough prior to inhalation. (D) He(She) understands the manner of inhalation, such as the rate of inhalation and timing. (E) He(She) holds his(her) breath for at least 5 seconds after inhalation. (F) He (She) breathes out after removing the inhaler from his(her) mouth. (G) He(She) rinses his(her) mouth after using the inhaler. The number above the bars indicates the number of patient cases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392488&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in the patients' ability to use their inhalers between pre-education and posteducation. “Can do” at each step was defined as a degree of performance that was “good” or “excellent,” while “Can't do” was corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” (A) He(She) can open the lid correctly. (B) He(She) can hold the inhaler(s) properly. (C) He(She) exhales enough prior to inhalation. (D) He(She) understands the manner of inhalation, such as the rate of inhalation and timing. (E) He(She) holds his(her) breath for at least 5 seconds after inhalation. (F) He (She) breathes out after removing the inhaler from his(her) mouth. (G) He(She) rinses his(her) mouth after using the inhaler. The number above the bars indicates the number of patient cases.

Mentions: The physicians assessed seven steps related with inhaler use both before and after the education. The degree of performance in each step was originally evaluated according to a four-grade scale (worst, bad, good, and excellent). “Can do” at each step was defined when the degree of performance was rated as “good” or “excellent.” In contrast, “Can't do” was designated when the responses corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” Out of all the patients, 115 could demonstrate how to use their inhalers before the education. The posteducation assessment on the usage of inhalers was available in 118 of the 128 patients. The participants made the least number of errors during the step of opening the lid of the inhaler correctly, whereas the maximal expiration prior to the inspiration step was the one where patients most frequently made errors (Figure 2).


The Need for a Well-Organized, Video-Assisted Asthma Education Program at Korean Primary Care Clinics
Changes in the patients' ability to use their inhalers between pre-education and posteducation. “Can do” at each step was defined as a degree of performance that was “good” or “excellent,” while “Can't do” was corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” (A) He(She) can open the lid correctly. (B) He(She) can hold the inhaler(s) properly. (C) He(She) exhales enough prior to inhalation. (D) He(She) understands the manner of inhalation, such as the rate of inhalation and timing. (E) He(She) holds his(her) breath for at least 5 seconds after inhalation. (F) He (She) breathes out after removing the inhaler from his(her) mouth. (G) He(She) rinses his(her) mouth after using the inhaler. The number above the bars indicates the number of patient cases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392488&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in the patients' ability to use their inhalers between pre-education and posteducation. “Can do” at each step was defined as a degree of performance that was “good” or “excellent,” while “Can't do” was corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” (A) He(She) can open the lid correctly. (B) He(She) can hold the inhaler(s) properly. (C) He(She) exhales enough prior to inhalation. (D) He(She) understands the manner of inhalation, such as the rate of inhalation and timing. (E) He(She) holds his(her) breath for at least 5 seconds after inhalation. (F) He (She) breathes out after removing the inhaler from his(her) mouth. (G) He(She) rinses his(her) mouth after using the inhaler. The number above the bars indicates the number of patient cases.
Mentions: The physicians assessed seven steps related with inhaler use both before and after the education. The degree of performance in each step was originally evaluated according to a four-grade scale (worst, bad, good, and excellent). “Can do” at each step was defined when the degree of performance was rated as “good” or “excellent.” In contrast, “Can't do” was designated when the responses corresponded to “bad” or “worst.” Out of all the patients, 115 could demonstrate how to use their inhalers before the education. The posteducation assessment on the usage of inhalers was available in 118 of the 128 patients. The participants made the least number of errors during the step of opening the lid of the inhaler correctly, whereas the maximal expiration prior to the inspiration step was the one where patients most frequently made errors (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of our new video-assisted asthma education program on patients' knowledge regarding asthma and asthma control.

Methods: Adult asthmatics who were diagnosed by primary care physicians and followed for at least 1 year were educated via smart devices and pamphlets. The education sessions were carried out three times at 2-week intervals. Each education period lasted at most 5 minutes. The effectiveness was then evaluated using questionnaires and an asthma control test (ACT).

Results: The study enrolled 144 patients (mean age, 56.7±16.7 years). Half of the patients had not been taught how to use their inhalers. After participating in the education program, the participants' understanding of asthma improved significantly across all six items of a questionnaire assessing their general knowledge of asthma. The proportion of patients who made errors while manipulating their inhalers was reduced to less than 10%. The ACT score increased from 16.6±4.6 to 20.0±3.9 (p<0.001). The number of asthmatics whose ACT score was at least 20 increased from 45 (33.3%) to 93 (65.3%) (p<0.001). The magnitude of improvement in the ACT score did not differ between patients who received an education session at least three times within 1 year and those who had not. The majority of patients agreed to the need for an education program (95.8%) and showed a willingness to pay an additional cost for the education (81.9%).

Conclusion: This study indicated that our newly developed education program would become an effective component of asthma management in primary care clinics.

No MeSH data available.