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The Need for a Well-Organized, Video-Assisted Asthma Education Program at Korean Primary Care Clinics

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of our new video-assisted asthma education program on patients' knowledge regarding asthma and asthma control.

Methods: Adult asthmatics who were diagnosed by primary care physicians and followed for at least 1 year were educated via smart devices and pamphlets. The education sessions were carried out three times at 2-week intervals. Each education period lasted at most 5 minutes. The effectiveness was then evaluated using questionnaires and an asthma control test (ACT).

Results: The study enrolled 144 patients (mean age, 56.7±16.7 years). Half of the patients had not been taught how to use their inhalers. After participating in the education program, the participants' understanding of asthma improved significantly across all six items of a questionnaire assessing their general knowledge of asthma. The proportion of patients who made errors while manipulating their inhalers was reduced to less than 10%. The ACT score increased from 16.6±4.6 to 20.0±3.9 (p<0.001). The number of asthmatics whose ACT score was at least 20 increased from 45 (33.3%) to 93 (65.3%) (p<0.001). The magnitude of improvement in the ACT score did not differ between patients who received an education session at least three times within 1 year and those who had not. The majority of patients agreed to the need for an education program (95.8%) and showed a willingness to pay an additional cost for the education (81.9%).

Conclusion: This study indicated that our newly developed education program would become an effective component of asthma management in primary care clinics.

No MeSH data available.


Primary care clinics visits and the process of the education program.
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Figure 1: Primary care clinics visits and the process of the education program.

Mentions: The asthmatics who were enrolled were scheduled for three educational visits in 1 month (Figure 1). In week 0, their baseline knowledge of asthma was assessed using questionnaires, and their methods of inhaler use were also tested after the participants provided informed consent. Thereafter, the first education session about asthma itself and how to use their inhalers was started with key message education using pamphlets. This education was reinforced by having the participants watch videos on a smart device. The patients visited their clinics 2 weeks later (week 2) for the second education session. During week 2, patients were given an action plan for acute exacerbations. Their physicians also observed how they used their inhalers. After that, video-assisted education sessions on acute exacerbations and inhalation techniques were conducted. In the fourth week (week 4), all of the information about asthma was reviewed via videos and was also refreshed by the physicians. Additionally, patients gave a demonstration of how to use their inhalers. Shortly thereafter, the second questionnaire was administered. It included the participants' degree of satisfaction with the education program, their knowledge of asthma, their asthma control test (ACT) score, and questions about each step of inhaler use, which had five, seven, six, and three items, respectively. The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of the ACT score was defined as three points7. The duration of the education session at each visit was 5 minutes or less. The patients were educated in the waiting room of each clinic.


The Need for a Well-Organized, Video-Assisted Asthma Education Program at Korean Primary Care Clinics
Primary care clinics visits and the process of the education program.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392488&req=5

Figure 1: Primary care clinics visits and the process of the education program.
Mentions: The asthmatics who were enrolled were scheduled for three educational visits in 1 month (Figure 1). In week 0, their baseline knowledge of asthma was assessed using questionnaires, and their methods of inhaler use were also tested after the participants provided informed consent. Thereafter, the first education session about asthma itself and how to use their inhalers was started with key message education using pamphlets. This education was reinforced by having the participants watch videos on a smart device. The patients visited their clinics 2 weeks later (week 2) for the second education session. During week 2, patients were given an action plan for acute exacerbations. Their physicians also observed how they used their inhalers. After that, video-assisted education sessions on acute exacerbations and inhalation techniques were conducted. In the fourth week (week 4), all of the information about asthma was reviewed via videos and was also refreshed by the physicians. Additionally, patients gave a demonstration of how to use their inhalers. Shortly thereafter, the second questionnaire was administered. It included the participants' degree of satisfaction with the education program, their knowledge of asthma, their asthma control test (ACT) score, and questions about each step of inhaler use, which had five, seven, six, and three items, respectively. The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of the ACT score was defined as three points7. The duration of the education session at each visit was 5 minutes or less. The patients were educated in the waiting room of each clinic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of our new video-assisted asthma education program on patients' knowledge regarding asthma and asthma control.

Methods: Adult asthmatics who were diagnosed by primary care physicians and followed for at least 1 year were educated via smart devices and pamphlets. The education sessions were carried out three times at 2-week intervals. Each education period lasted at most 5 minutes. The effectiveness was then evaluated using questionnaires and an asthma control test (ACT).

Results: The study enrolled 144 patients (mean age, 56.7±16.7 years). Half of the patients had not been taught how to use their inhalers. After participating in the education program, the participants' understanding of asthma improved significantly across all six items of a questionnaire assessing their general knowledge of asthma. The proportion of patients who made errors while manipulating their inhalers was reduced to less than 10%. The ACT score increased from 16.6±4.6 to 20.0±3.9 (p<0.001). The number of asthmatics whose ACT score was at least 20 increased from 45 (33.3%) to 93 (65.3%) (p<0.001). The magnitude of improvement in the ACT score did not differ between patients who received an education session at least three times within 1 year and those who had not. The majority of patients agreed to the need for an education program (95.8%) and showed a willingness to pay an additional cost for the education (81.9%).

Conclusion: This study indicated that our newly developed education program would become an effective component of asthma management in primary care clinics.

No MeSH data available.