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Prevalence and ethnic/racial disparities in the distribution of pediatric injuries in South Florida: implications for the development of community prevention programs

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The state of Florida continues to report significant gender, ethnic and racial disparities in trauma incidence, access to care and outcomes in the adult population. Our objective was to assess pediatric injury profiles and ethnic/racial disparities of specific injuries in a Regional Trauma Center (TC) in South Florida.

Methods: Retrospective data from November 2011 to December 2015 were obtained from the Level 2 TC registry for children ≤21 years old. Demographic, injury pattern, geographic area, injury scores and treatment data were analyzed.

Results: One thousand six hundred ten patients, ages 0–21 years were cared for at the TC from 2011 to 2015.73% were males. Mean age = 15.7 years. Mortality was 2.3%. Using zip code data and using geographic mapping, we identified two main clusters where injuries were occurring. A multinomial regression analysis demonstrated that Hispanics had higher risks of falls (RR 10.4, 95% CI 2.7–29), motorcycle accidents (RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.7–8.2) and motor vehicle accidents (RR 6.4, 95% CI 3.6–11.4). Black/African American children had higher risks of gunshot wounds and resultant mortality (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: There were racial, ethnic and gender disparities in the patterns of injury and outcomes among the youth attended at our TC. Geographic mapping allowed us the identification of the zones in South Florida where injuries were occurring. Understanding the differences and using geographic mapping to identify regions of higher prevalence will complement planning for prevention programs.

No MeSH data available.


Association of mortality and race
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Fig3: Association of mortality and race

Mentions: A multinomial regression model was performed to ascertain the effects of age, race and ethnicity on the likelihood of suffering specific injuries, such as gunshot wounds, motor vehicle, motorcycle, pedestrian, stabbing or other injuries. The reference group was Black (Table 3). This model was significant, ×2 (42) = 278.53, p < 0.0001. The model explained 40.2% (Nagelkerke R2) of the variance. Hispanics had higher relative risks of falls (RR 10.4, 95% CI 2.7-29); higher relative risks for motor vehicle injuries (RR 6.4, 95% CI 3.6–11.4) and higher relative risks for motorcycle injuries (RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.7–8.2) than Black/AA children. Whites also had higher relative risks of falls (RR 6.42, 95% CI 2.5–16.5) than Black/AA children. Overall, Black/AA children had higher risks of gunshot wounds and of resultant mortality (Fig. 3). Interestingly, all mortalities for gunshot wounds in Black/AA children occurred within the same longitude and latitude areas of their residence. No significant differences were observed when adjusting for age and race for stabbing and pedestrian injuries.Table 3


Prevalence and ethnic/racial disparities in the distribution of pediatric injuries in South Florida: implications for the development of community prevention programs
Association of mortality and race
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392450&req=5

Fig3: Association of mortality and race
Mentions: A multinomial regression model was performed to ascertain the effects of age, race and ethnicity on the likelihood of suffering specific injuries, such as gunshot wounds, motor vehicle, motorcycle, pedestrian, stabbing or other injuries. The reference group was Black (Table 3). This model was significant, ×2 (42) = 278.53, p < 0.0001. The model explained 40.2% (Nagelkerke R2) of the variance. Hispanics had higher relative risks of falls (RR 10.4, 95% CI 2.7-29); higher relative risks for motor vehicle injuries (RR 6.4, 95% CI 3.6–11.4) and higher relative risks for motorcycle injuries (RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.7–8.2) than Black/AA children. Whites also had higher relative risks of falls (RR 6.42, 95% CI 2.5–16.5) than Black/AA children. Overall, Black/AA children had higher risks of gunshot wounds and of resultant mortality (Fig. 3). Interestingly, all mortalities for gunshot wounds in Black/AA children occurred within the same longitude and latitude areas of their residence. No significant differences were observed when adjusting for age and race for stabbing and pedestrian injuries.Table 3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The state of Florida continues to report significant gender, ethnic and racial disparities in trauma incidence, access to care and outcomes in the adult population. Our objective was to assess pediatric injury profiles and ethnic/racial disparities of specific injuries in a Regional Trauma Center (TC) in South Florida.

Methods: Retrospective data from November 2011 to December 2015 were obtained from the Level 2 TC registry for children &le;21&nbsp;years old. Demographic, injury pattern, geographic area, injury scores and treatment data were analyzed.

Results: One thousand six hundred ten patients, ages 0&ndash;21 years were cared for at the TC from 2011 to 2015.73% were males. Mean age&thinsp;=&thinsp;15.7&nbsp;years. Mortality was 2.3%. Using zip code data and using geographic mapping, we identified two main clusters where injuries were occurring. A multinomial regression analysis demonstrated that Hispanics had higher risks of falls (RR 10.4, 95% CI 2.7&ndash;29), motorcycle accidents (RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.7&ndash;8.2) and motor vehicle accidents (RR 6.4, 95% CI 3.6&ndash;11.4). Black/African American children had higher risks of gunshot wounds and resultant mortality (p&thinsp;&lt;&thinsp;0.01).

Conclusion: There were racial, ethnic and gender disparities in the patterns of injury and outcomes among the youth attended at our TC. Geographic mapping allowed us the identification of the zones in South Florida where injuries were occurring. Understanding the differences and using geographic mapping to identify regions of higher prevalence will complement planning for prevention programs.

No MeSH data available.