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Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses' placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient's eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

No MeSH data available.


Telescope root mean square (RMS) wavefront error (a) and visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) (b) versus decentration of the anterior lens.
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fig6: Telescope root mean square (RMS) wavefront error (a) and visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) (b) versus decentration of the anterior lens.

Mentions: Figure 6 represents graphically the optical quality results for distance in terms of wavefront RMS error. The wavefront RMS error results were calculated through the ray-tracing software, and they were measured for 587.6 nm wavelength. Figure 6 also shows the visual quality results for distance in terms of the visual Strehl ratio. The VSOTF results were calculated through a pupil of 3 mm diameter.


Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model
Telescope root mean square (RMS) wavefront error (a) and visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) (b) versus decentration of the anterior lens.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392401&req=5

fig6: Telescope root mean square (RMS) wavefront error (a) and visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) (b) versus decentration of the anterior lens.
Mentions: Figure 6 represents graphically the optical quality results for distance in terms of wavefront RMS error. The wavefront RMS error results were calculated through the ray-tracing software, and they were measured for 587.6 nm wavelength. Figure 6 also shows the visual quality results for distance in terms of the visual Strehl ratio. The VSOTF results were calculated through a pupil of 3 mm diameter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses' placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient's eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

No MeSH data available.