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Factors responsible for remote-frequency masking in children and adults a)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Susceptibility to remote-frequency masking in children and adults was evaluated with respect to three stimulus features: (1) masker bandwidth, (2) spectral separation of the signal and masker, and (3) gated versus continuous masker presentation. Listeners were 4- to 6-year-olds, 7- to 10-year-olds, and adults. Detection thresholds for a 500-ms, 2000-Hz signal were estimated in quiet or presented with a band of noise in one of four frequency regions: 425–500 Hz, 4000–4075 Hz, 8000–8075 Hz, or 4000–10 000 Hz. In experiment 1, maskers were gated on in each 500-ms interval of a three-interval, forced-choice adaptive procedure. Masking was observed for all ages in all maskers, but the greatest masking was observed for the 4000–4075 Hz masker. These findings suggest that signal/masker spectral proximity plays an important role in remote-frequency masking, even when peripheral excitation associated with the signal and masker does not overlap. Younger children tended to have more masking than older children or adults, consistent with a reduced ability to segregate simultaneous sounds and/or listen in a frequency-selective manner. In experiment 2, detection thresholds were estimated in the same noises, but maskers were presented continuously. Masking was reduced for all ages relative to gated conditions, suggesting improved segregation and/or frequency-selective listening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(Color online) Estimates of masking in the presence of the gated, remote-frequency maskers are shown for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes). Data are plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners.
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f1: (Color online) Estimates of masking in the presence of the gated, remote-frequency maskers are shown for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes). Data are plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners.

Mentions: Figure 1 summarizes estimates of masking for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes), plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners. One question of interest is whether masking was significantly greater than zero across masker type and listener age group. A set of 12 one-sample t-tests was performed to evaluate this question. Of these, ten indicate a significant difference. A non-significant result was obtained for children younger than 7 years of age tested with the 8000–8075 Hz masker (p = 0.06) and children older than 7 years of age tested with the 475–500 Hz masker (p = 0.07).


Factors responsible for remote-frequency masking in children and adults a)
(Color online) Estimates of masking in the presence of the gated, remote-frequency maskers are shown for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes). Data are plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners.
© Copyright Policy - ccc - open
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392082&req=5

f1: (Color online) Estimates of masking in the presence of the gated, remote-frequency maskers are shown for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes). Data are plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners.
Mentions: Figure 1 summarizes estimates of masking for younger children (<7 years, open boxes), older children (>7 years, light grey boxes), and adults (dark grey boxes), plotted as a function of masker band condition. The horizontal line within each box represents the median value, boxes span the interquartile range (25th–75th percentile), and vertical lines span the 10th to the 90th percentiles. Circles show amount of masking for individual listeners. One question of interest is whether masking was significantly greater than zero across masker type and listener age group. A set of 12 one-sample t-tests was performed to evaluate this question. Of these, ten indicate a significant difference. A non-significant result was obtained for children younger than 7 years of age tested with the 8000–8075 Hz masker (p = 0.06) and children older than 7 years of age tested with the 475–500 Hz masker (p = 0.07).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Susceptibility to remote-frequency masking in children and adults was evaluated with respect to three stimulus features: (1) masker bandwidth, (2) spectral separation of the signal and masker, and (3) gated versus continuous masker presentation. Listeners were 4- to 6-year-olds, 7- to 10-year-olds, and adults. Detection thresholds for a 500-ms, 2000-Hz signal were estimated in quiet or presented with a band of noise in one of four frequency regions: 425&ndash;500&thinsp;Hz, 4000&ndash;4075&thinsp;Hz, 8000&ndash;8075&thinsp;Hz, or 4000&ndash;10&thinsp;000&thinsp;Hz. In experiment 1, maskers were gated on in each 500-ms interval of a three-interval, forced-choice adaptive procedure. Masking was observed for all ages in all maskers, but the greatest masking was observed for the 4000&ndash;4075&thinsp;Hz masker. These findings suggest that signal/masker spectral proximity plays an important role in remote-frequency masking, even when peripheral excitation associated with the signal and masker does not overlap. Younger children tended to have more masking than older children or adults, consistent with a reduced ability to segregate simultaneous sounds and/or listen in a frequency-selective manner. In experiment 2, detection thresholds were estimated in the same noises, but maskers were presented continuously. Masking was reduced for all ages relative to gated conditions, suggesting improved segregation and/or frequency-selective listening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus