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Olfactory Neuroepithelial Neural Progenitor Cells from Subjects with Bipolar I Disorder

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Research into the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is limited by the inability to examine brain cellular processes in subjects with the illness.

Methods: Endoscopic biopsy was performed in subjects with bipolar I disorder to establish olfactory neural progenitor (ONP) cell lines. Olfactory function was assessed prebiopsy and postbiopsy using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Cells were characterized to determine their lineage.

Results: There were no significant complications associated with the biopsy procedure, including olfaction. Outpatient olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy yielded ONP cells in three out of 13 biopsy attempts (23.1%). ONPs were positive for neuron-specific proteins (β-tubulin III, nestin, hexaribonucleotide binding protein-3, and peripherin) and glia-specific proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein).

Conclusions: ONP cells can be obtained safely from awake outpatients and are potentially useful for pathophysiological studies of bipolar illness and perhaps other neuropsychiatric conditions. Such cells allow for the investigation of potential pathological cellular processes without the confounding factors of genetic manipulation, which is required for induced pluripotent cells.

No MeSH data available.


Site of olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy.
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f1-10.1177_1179573517694529: Site of olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy.

Mentions: This procedure was performed in an office setting under local anesthesia. Prior to biopsy, subjects underwent comprehensive nasal endoscopy using a 0°, 4-mm rigid Hopkins rod endoscope to determine the preferred side to perform the procedure. Anesthesia was achieved with 2% pontocaine/0.5% phenylephrine hydrochloride solution sprayed into the nasal cavity supplemented with 1 mL of 1% xylocaine/1:100,000 epinephrine infiltrated into the dorsoposterior septum. Using microsurgical instruments, a 16-mm2 biopsy of mucosa with underlying periosteum was harvested from the nasal septum just anterior to the sphenoid rostrum (Figure 1). A small piece of gelfoam was placed over the biopsy site to complete the procedure. Endoscopic examination was performed two weeks and three months following the biopsy to monitor the complications.


Olfactory Neuroepithelial Neural Progenitor Cells from Subjects with Bipolar I Disorder
Site of olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392049&req=5

f1-10.1177_1179573517694529: Site of olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy.
Mentions: This procedure was performed in an office setting under local anesthesia. Prior to biopsy, subjects underwent comprehensive nasal endoscopy using a 0°, 4-mm rigid Hopkins rod endoscope to determine the preferred side to perform the procedure. Anesthesia was achieved with 2% pontocaine/0.5% phenylephrine hydrochloride solution sprayed into the nasal cavity supplemented with 1 mL of 1% xylocaine/1:100,000 epinephrine infiltrated into the dorsoposterior septum. Using microsurgical instruments, a 16-mm2 biopsy of mucosa with underlying periosteum was harvested from the nasal septum just anterior to the sphenoid rostrum (Figure 1). A small piece of gelfoam was placed over the biopsy site to complete the procedure. Endoscopic examination was performed two weeks and three months following the biopsy to monitor the complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Research into the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is limited by the inability to examine brain cellular processes in subjects with the illness.

Methods: Endoscopic biopsy was performed in subjects with bipolar I disorder to establish olfactory neural progenitor (ONP) cell lines. Olfactory function was assessed prebiopsy and postbiopsy using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Cells were characterized to determine their lineage.

Results: There were no significant complications associated with the biopsy procedure, including olfaction. Outpatient olfactory neuroepithelial biopsy yielded ONP cells in three out of 13 biopsy attempts (23.1%). ONPs were positive for neuron-specific proteins (β-tubulin III, nestin, hexaribonucleotide binding protein-3, and peripherin) and glia-specific proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein).

Conclusions: ONP cells can be obtained safely from awake outpatients and are potentially useful for pathophysiological studies of bipolar illness and perhaps other neuropsychiatric conditions. Such cells allow for the investigation of potential pathological cellular processes without the confounding factors of genetic manipulation, which is required for induced pluripotent cells.

No MeSH data available.