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Rapidly Progressing Myelodysplastic Syndrome Initially Presenting as Acute Leukemia

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ABSTRACT

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) refers to a group of various stem cell disorders, characterized by dysplastic and ineffective production in one or more cell lines. In general, MDS tends to present slowly over months to years and is commonly detected with routine bloodwork by primary care physicians. Patients may be asymptomatic and depending on age, comorbidities and risk classification of MDS may not require aggressive therapy. However, MDS carries the risk of progressing to acute leukemia over time. We present a case of rapidly progressive MDS in a previously healthy middle-aged female, originally presenting and treated as acute leukemia.

No MeSH data available.


Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) showing chromosome 5q deletion
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FIG3: Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) showing chromosome 5q deletion

Mentions: In the outpatient setting, she was subsequently diagnosed with high-risk MDS with chromosome 5q deletion and trisomy eight via fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) (Figures 3-4).


Rapidly Progressing Myelodysplastic Syndrome Initially Presenting as Acute Leukemia
Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) showing chromosome 5q deletion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392037&req=5

FIG3: Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) showing chromosome 5q deletion
Mentions: In the outpatient setting, she was subsequently diagnosed with high-risk MDS with chromosome 5q deletion and trisomy eight via fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) (Figures 3-4).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) refers to a group of various stem cell disorders, characterized by dysplastic and ineffective production in one or more cell lines. In general, MDS tends to present slowly over months to years and is commonly detected with routine bloodwork by primary care physicians. Patients may be asymptomatic and depending on age, comorbidities and risk classification of MDS may not require aggressive therapy. However, MDS carries the risk of progressing to acute leukemia over time. We present a case of rapidly progressive MDS in a previously healthy middle-aged female, originally presenting and treated as acute leukemia.

No MeSH data available.