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Substitution Patterns of Phoneme Errors in Hearing Aid and Cochlear Implant Users

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: It is acknowledged that speech perceptual errors are increased in listeners who have sensorineural hearing loss as noise increases. However, there is a lack of detailed information for their error pattern. The purpose of the present study was to analyze substitution patterns of phoneme errors in Korean hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) users who are postlingually deafened adults.

Subjects and methods: In quiet and under two noise conditions, the phoneme errors of twenty HA and fourteen CI users were measured by using monosyllabic words, and a substitution pattern was analyzed in terms of manner of articulation.

Results: The results showed that both groups had a high percentage of nasal and plosive substitutions regardless of background conditions.

Conclusions: This finding will provide vital information for understanding the speech perception of hearing-impaired listeners and for improving their ability to communicate when applied to auditory training.

No MeSH data available.


Group mean of hearing threshold in dB HL, a function of frequency in hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) groups
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Figure 1: Group mean of hearing threshold in dB HL, a function of frequency in hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) groups

Mentions: Fig. 1 indicates the unaided and aided hearing thresholds of HA and CI groups in terms of the better ear, although they had symmetrical bilateral hearing loss. There was a significant difference in the unaided threshold in all frequencies between the two groups. However, in the aided threshold, the CI group showed slightly better detection in high frequency regions than the HA group, as expected. However, the most comfortable levels (MCL) of the two groups showed little difference bilaterally, indicating 58.5±3.67 dB HL and 57.14±2.26 dB HL for HA and CI, respectively, in the aided condition. All subjects were native Korean speakers and all completed the informed consent form before the experiment.


Substitution Patterns of Phoneme Errors in Hearing Aid and Cochlear Implant Users
Group mean of hearing threshold in dB HL, a function of frequency in hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) groups
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5392003&req=5

Figure 1: Group mean of hearing threshold in dB HL, a function of frequency in hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) groups
Mentions: Fig. 1 indicates the unaided and aided hearing thresholds of HA and CI groups in terms of the better ear, although they had symmetrical bilateral hearing loss. There was a significant difference in the unaided threshold in all frequencies between the two groups. However, in the aided threshold, the CI group showed slightly better detection in high frequency regions than the HA group, as expected. However, the most comfortable levels (MCL) of the two groups showed little difference bilaterally, indicating 58.5±3.67 dB HL and 57.14±2.26 dB HL for HA and CI, respectively, in the aided condition. All subjects were native Korean speakers and all completed the informed consent form before the experiment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: It is acknowledged that speech perceptual errors are increased in listeners who have sensorineural hearing loss as noise increases. However, there is a lack of detailed information for their error pattern. The purpose of the present study was to analyze substitution patterns of phoneme errors in Korean hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) users who are postlingually deafened adults.

Subjects and methods: In quiet and under two noise conditions, the phoneme errors of twenty HA and fourteen CI users were measured by using monosyllabic words, and a substitution pattern was analyzed in terms of manner of articulation.

Results: The results showed that both groups had a high percentage of nasal and plosive substitutions regardless of background conditions.

Conclusions: This finding will provide vital information for understanding the speech perception of hearing-impaired listeners and for improving their ability to communicate when applied to auditory training.

No MeSH data available.