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Phthalate exposure and reproductive hormones and sex-hormone binding globulin before puberty – Phthalate contaminated-foodstuff episode in Taiwan

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: In May 2011, a major incident involving phthalates-contaminated foodstuffs occurred in Taiwan. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was added to foodstuffs, mainly juice, jelly, tea, sports drink, and dietary supplements. Concerns arose that normal pubertal development, especially reproductive hormone regulation in children, could be disrupted by DEHP exposure.

Objective: To investigate the association between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels among children following potential exposure to phthalate-tainted foodstuffs.

Methods: A total of 239 children aged <12 years old were recruited from 3 hospitals in north, central, and south Taiwan after the episode. Structured questionnaires were used to collect the frequency and quantity of exposures to 5 categories of phthalate-contaminated foodstuffs to assess phthalate exposure in children. Urine samples were collected for the measurement of phthalate metabolites. The estimated daily intake of DEHP exposure at the time of the contamination incident occurred was calculated using both questionnaire data and urinary DEHP metabolite concentrations. Multiple regression analyses were applied to assess associations between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels in children.

Results: After excluding children with missing data regarding exposure levels and hormone concentrations and girls with menstruation, 222 children were included in the statistical analyses. After adjustment for age and birth weight, girls with above median levels of urinary mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and sum of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate concentrations had higher odds of above median follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations. Girls with above median estimated average daily DEHP exposures following the contamination episode also had higher odds of sex hormone-binding globulin above median levels.

Conclusions: Phthalate exposure was associated with alterations of reproductive hormone levels in girls.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart of participant recruitment.
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pone.0175536.g001: Flow chart of participant recruitment.

Mentions: The study subjects were recruited from the RAPIT Project 2011 at 3 expert hospitals, the Ministry of Health and Welfare Hospital in Taipei and Taichung and the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospitals. A total of 347 participants, including 237 children (<12 years old), 13 adolescents (12–18 years old), and 97 adults (≥18 years old) were invited to participate during the period from August 2012 to February 2013 (Fig 1). Subjects or their parents gave informed consent and filled out an exposure assessment questionnaire about phthalate exposure; urine and blood samples were collected for phthalate metabolite and biochemical marker measurement; and participants received physical examinations. Children who provided written consent from both their main caretaker and themselves were our major subjects and were recruited into the present study. The study process was approved by the Research Ethnics Committee of the National Health Research Institutes.


Phthalate exposure and reproductive hormones and sex-hormone binding globulin before puberty – Phthalate contaminated-foodstuff episode in Taiwan
Flow chart of participant recruitment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5391940&req=5

pone.0175536.g001: Flow chart of participant recruitment.
Mentions: The study subjects were recruited from the RAPIT Project 2011 at 3 expert hospitals, the Ministry of Health and Welfare Hospital in Taipei and Taichung and the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospitals. A total of 347 participants, including 237 children (<12 years old), 13 adolescents (12–18 years old), and 97 adults (≥18 years old) were invited to participate during the period from August 2012 to February 2013 (Fig 1). Subjects or their parents gave informed consent and filled out an exposure assessment questionnaire about phthalate exposure; urine and blood samples were collected for phthalate metabolite and biochemical marker measurement; and participants received physical examinations. Children who provided written consent from both their main caretaker and themselves were our major subjects and were recruited into the present study. The study process was approved by the Research Ethnics Committee of the National Health Research Institutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: In May 2011, a major incident involving phthalates-contaminated foodstuffs occurred in Taiwan. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was added to foodstuffs, mainly juice, jelly, tea, sports drink, and dietary supplements. Concerns arose that normal pubertal development, especially reproductive hormone regulation in children, could be disrupted by DEHP exposure.

Objective: To investigate the association between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels among children following potential exposure to phthalate-tainted foodstuffs.

Methods: A total of 239 children aged &lt;12 years old were recruited from 3 hospitals in north, central, and south Taiwan after the episode. Structured questionnaires were used to collect the frequency and quantity of exposures to 5 categories of phthalate-contaminated foodstuffs to assess phthalate exposure in children. Urine samples were collected for the measurement of phthalate metabolites. The estimated daily intake of DEHP exposure at the time of the contamination incident occurred was calculated using both questionnaire data and urinary DEHP metabolite concentrations. Multiple regression analyses were applied to assess associations between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels in children.

Results: After excluding children with missing data regarding exposure levels and hormone concentrations and girls with menstruation, 222 children were included in the statistical analyses. After adjustment for age and birth weight, girls with above median levels of urinary mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and sum of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate concentrations had higher odds of above median follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations. Girls with above median estimated average daily DEHP exposures following the contamination episode also had higher odds of sex hormone-binding globulin above median levels.

Conclusions: Phthalate exposure was associated with alterations of reproductive hormone levels in girls.

No MeSH data available.