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Bispectral index value correlates with Glasgow Coma Scale in traumatic brain injury patients

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Accuracy of consciousness level assessment is very important. It may determine and influence further clinical decisions, thus influences patients’ outcomes. The widest method in determining the level of awareness is the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Despite its common use, GCS scores obtained by one clinician may differ from others depending on their interpretations and past experience. One of the tools used to assess the level of consciousness objectively is bispectral index (BIS). The aim of this study was to identify the correlation between BIS and GCS score in patients with traumatic brain injury.

Patients and methods: A total of 78 patients who were admitted to emergency room for traumatic brain injury were included in this study. One observer evaluated the GCS of all patients to minimize subjectivity. Another investigator then obtained the BIS values for each patient. Spear-man’s rank correlation coefficient was used to determine whether GCS correlated with BIS value.

Results: In 78 patients, the BIS was found to be significantly correlated with GCS (r=0.744, p<0.01). The BIS values increased with an increasing GCS. Mean BIS values of mild, moderate, and severe head injury were 88.1±5.6, 72.1±11.1, and 60.4±11.7, respectively.

Conclusion: In this study, a significant correlation existed between GCS and BIS. This finding suggests that BIS may be used for assessing GCS in patients with traumatic brain injury. However, the scatters of BIS values for any GCS level may limit the BIS in predicting GCS accurately.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot display for correlation between GCS and BIS values.Abbreviations: BIS, bispectral index; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale.
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f1-oaem-9-043: Scatter plot display for correlation between GCS and BIS values.Abbreviations: BIS, bispectral index; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale.

Mentions: A strong positive correlation was found between BIS and GCS by using Spearman’s correlation test (r=0.744, p<0.01) as shown in Table 2. Scatter plot between BIS values and GCS scores is shown in Figure 1. The mean BIS values for mild, moderate, and severe head injury were 84.1±5.6, 72.1±11.1, and 60.4±11.7, respectively. Mean BIS values at different head injury severity levels are shown in Figure 2.


Bispectral index value correlates with Glasgow Coma Scale in traumatic brain injury patients
Scatter plot display for correlation between GCS and BIS values.Abbreviations: BIS, bispectral index; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5391833&req=5

f1-oaem-9-043: Scatter plot display for correlation between GCS and BIS values.Abbreviations: BIS, bispectral index; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale.
Mentions: A strong positive correlation was found between BIS and GCS by using Spearman’s correlation test (r=0.744, p<0.01) as shown in Table 2. Scatter plot between BIS values and GCS scores is shown in Figure 1. The mean BIS values for mild, moderate, and severe head injury were 84.1±5.6, 72.1±11.1, and 60.4±11.7, respectively. Mean BIS values at different head injury severity levels are shown in Figure 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Accuracy of consciousness level assessment is very important. It may determine and influence further clinical decisions, thus influences patients&rsquo; outcomes. The widest method in determining the level of awareness is the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Despite its common use, GCS scores obtained by one clinician may differ from others depending on their interpretations and past experience. One of the tools used to assess the level of consciousness objectively is bispectral index (BIS). The aim of this study was to identify the correlation between BIS and GCS score in patients with traumatic brain injury.

Patients and methods: A total of 78 patients who were admitted to emergency room for traumatic brain injury were included in this study. One observer evaluated the GCS of all patients to minimize subjectivity. Another investigator then obtained the BIS values for each patient. Spear-man&rsquo;s rank correlation coefficient was used to determine whether GCS correlated with BIS value.

Results: In 78 patients, the BIS was found to be significantly correlated with GCS (r=0.744, p&lt;0.01). The BIS values increased with an increasing GCS. Mean BIS values of mild, moderate, and severe head injury were 88.1&plusmn;5.6, 72.1&plusmn;11.1, and 60.4&plusmn;11.7, respectively.

Conclusion: In this study, a significant correlation existed between GCS and BIS. This finding suggests that BIS may be used for assessing GCS in patients with traumatic brain injury. However, the scatters of BIS values for any GCS level may limit the BIS in predicting GCS accurately.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus