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Diverging temperature responses of CO 2 assimilation and plant development explain the overall effect of temperature on biomass accumulation in wheat leaves and grains

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Under rising temperature, the rate of any developmental process increased with temperature more rapidly than that of CO2 assimilation. We found that this discrepancy, summarised by the CO2 assimilation rate per unit of plant development, could explain the observed reductions in biomass accumulation in leaves and grain under high temperatures. This simple model describes the effects of night and day temperature equally well, and offers a simple framework for describing the effects of temperature on plant growth, without any supplementary effect of rising night temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


Observed values vs. calculated values for the reduction in final grain weight between temperatures treatments. Observed data come from the literature [see Supporting Information—Table S1]. Dashed line is the model x = y.
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plw092-F6: Observed values vs. calculated values for the reduction in final grain weight between temperatures treatments. Observed data come from the literature [see Supporting Information—Table S1]. Dashed line is the model x = y.

Mentions: This relationship was used to simulate final grain weight effects reported in seven different papers for various thermal scenarios involving T°day up to 30 °C and T°night up to 25 °C (Fig. 6). The predicted grain weight reductions were not far from the observed ones (R2  =  0.79), suggesting that the relationship between AN.20°C and grain growth rate could hold true for other genotypes, environmental conditions, and thermal scenarios within the investigated range. However, the model had a tendency to over-estimate the negative effect of rising temperatures (average bias of 16%), indicating a genetic variability for this relationship, or the influence of other physiological processes such as carbon remobilization to the grains.Figure 6


Diverging temperature responses of CO 2 assimilation and plant development explain the overall effect of temperature on biomass accumulation in wheat leaves and grains
Observed values vs. calculated values for the reduction in final grain weight between temperatures treatments. Observed data come from the literature [see Supporting Information—Table S1]. Dashed line is the model x = y.
© Copyright Policy - cc-by
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5391697&req=5

plw092-F6: Observed values vs. calculated values for the reduction in final grain weight between temperatures treatments. Observed data come from the literature [see Supporting Information—Table S1]. Dashed line is the model x = y.
Mentions: This relationship was used to simulate final grain weight effects reported in seven different papers for various thermal scenarios involving T°day up to 30 °C and T°night up to 25 °C (Fig. 6). The predicted grain weight reductions were not far from the observed ones (R2  =  0.79), suggesting that the relationship between AN.20°C and grain growth rate could hold true for other genotypes, environmental conditions, and thermal scenarios within the investigated range. However, the model had a tendency to over-estimate the negative effect of rising temperatures (average bias of 16%), indicating a genetic variability for this relationship, or the influence of other physiological processes such as carbon remobilization to the grains.Figure 6

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Under rising temperature, the rate of any developmental process increased with temperature more rapidly than that of CO2 assimilation. We found that this discrepancy, summarised by the CO2 assimilation rate per unit of plant development, could explain the observed reductions in biomass accumulation in leaves and grain under high temperatures. This simple model describes the effects of night and day temperature equally well, and offers a simple framework for describing the effects of temperature on plant growth, without any supplementary effect of rising night temperatures.

No MeSH data available.