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Diverging temperature responses of CO 2 assimilation and plant development explain the overall effect of temperature on biomass accumulation in wheat leaves and grains

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ABSTRACT

Under rising temperature, the rate of any developmental process increased with temperature more rapidly than that of CO2 assimilation. We found that this discrepancy, summarised by the CO2 assimilation rate per unit of plant development, could explain the observed reductions in biomass accumulation in leaves and grain under high temperatures. This simple model describes the effects of night and day temperature equally well, and offers a simple framework for describing the effects of temperature on plant growth, without any supplementary effect of rising night temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


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Time courses of leaf chlorophyll amount (SPAD units) under different temperature regimes (experiment 3), 20/15 °C (blue), 20/20 °C (green), 25/15 °C (red) and 25/20 °C (orange). Time is expressed either as day (d, a) or developmental time (d20°C, b). Dots: average values (n≥ 4). Error bar: average confidence intervals (p = 0.95). Lines are bilinear regressions with 3 parameters (SPAD0, ts, as). SPAD0 is fixed and common to all treatments. Inset in a) Values of ts. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval calculated by bootstrap (p = 0.95). Inset in b) Values of ts.20°C. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval (p = 0.95).
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plw092-F3: Time courses of leaf chlorophyll amount (SPAD units) under different temperature regimes (experiment 3), 20/15 °C (blue), 20/20 °C (green), 25/15 °C (red) and 25/20 °C (orange). Time is expressed either as day (d, a) or developmental time (d20°C, b). Dots: average values (n≥ 4). Error bar: average confidence intervals (p = 0.95). Lines are bilinear regressions with 3 parameters (SPAD0, ts, as). SPAD0 is fixed and common to all treatments. Inset in a) Values of ts. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval calculated by bootstrap (p = 0.95). Inset in b) Values of ts.20°C. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval (p = 0.95).

Mentions: Plants at anthesis were introduced to several temperature scenarios, and then leaf senescence and biomass accumulation in the grain were measured over time (Fig. 3a and Fig. 4a; Experiment 3; n > 4 for each time point). Chlorophyll content in the three last developed leaves, defined in SPAD units, was at first stable, and then decreased linearly. Fitting a bilinear model enabled the calculation of the time at which the chlorophyll level started to decrease (ts). This parameter was closely correlated with the average daily temperatures (from 20.0 ± 1.7 at 25/20 °C to 26.5 ± 3.4 d at 20/15 °C, Fig. 3a inset). When time and model parameters were expressed in developmental time units (Fig. 3b), profiles of leaf senescence were similar between thermal treatments (ts.20°C ranging from 21.8 ± 3.4 to 23.2 ± 3.7 d20°C; Fig. 3b inset).Figure 3


Diverging temperature responses of CO 2 assimilation and plant development explain the overall effect of temperature on biomass accumulation in wheat leaves and grains
Time courses of leaf chlorophyll amount (SPAD units) under different temperature regimes (experiment 3), 20/15 °C (blue), 20/20 °C (green), 25/15 °C (red) and 25/20 °C (orange). Time is expressed either as day (d, a) or developmental time (d20°C, b). Dots: average values (n≥ 4). Error bar: average confidence intervals (p = 0.95). Lines are bilinear regressions with 3 parameters (SPAD0, ts, as). SPAD0 is fixed and common to all treatments. Inset in a) Values of ts. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval calculated by bootstrap (p = 0.95). Inset in b) Values of ts.20°C. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval (p = 0.95).
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plw092-F3: Time courses of leaf chlorophyll amount (SPAD units) under different temperature regimes (experiment 3), 20/15 °C (blue), 20/20 °C (green), 25/15 °C (red) and 25/20 °C (orange). Time is expressed either as day (d, a) or developmental time (d20°C, b). Dots: average values (n≥ 4). Error bar: average confidence intervals (p = 0.95). Lines are bilinear regressions with 3 parameters (SPAD0, ts, as). SPAD0 is fixed and common to all treatments. Inset in a) Values of ts. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval calculated by bootstrap (p = 0.95). Inset in b) Values of ts.20°C. Bars: parameter value ± confidence interval (p = 0.95).
Mentions: Plants at anthesis were introduced to several temperature scenarios, and then leaf senescence and biomass accumulation in the grain were measured over time (Fig. 3a and Fig. 4a; Experiment 3; n > 4 for each time point). Chlorophyll content in the three last developed leaves, defined in SPAD units, was at first stable, and then decreased linearly. Fitting a bilinear model enabled the calculation of the time at which the chlorophyll level started to decrease (ts). This parameter was closely correlated with the average daily temperatures (from 20.0 ± 1.7 at 25/20 °C to 26.5 ± 3.4 d at 20/15 °C, Fig. 3a inset). When time and model parameters were expressed in developmental time units (Fig. 3b), profiles of leaf senescence were similar between thermal treatments (ts.20°C ranging from 21.8 ± 3.4 to 23.2 ± 3.7 d20°C; Fig. 3b inset).Figure 3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Under rising temperature, the rate of any developmental process increased with temperature more rapidly than that of CO2 assimilation. We found that this discrepancy, summarised by the CO2 assimilation rate per unit of plant development, could explain the observed reductions in biomass accumulation in leaves and grain under high temperatures. This simple model describes the effects of night and day temperature equally well, and offers a simple framework for describing the effects of temperature on plant growth, without any supplementary effect of rising night temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus