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Meeting the Aichi targets: Pushing for zero extinction conservation

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Effective protection of the ~19 000 IUCN-listed threatened species has never been more pressing. Ensuring the survival of the most vulnerable and irreplaceable taxa and places, such as those identified by the Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) species and their associated sites (AZEs&s), is an excellent opportunity to achieve the Aichi 2020 Targets T11 (protected areas) and T12 (preventing species extinctions). AZE taxa have small, single-site populations that are especially vulnerable to human-induced extinctions, particularly for the many amphibians. We show that AZEs&s can be protected feasibly and cost-effectively, but action is urgent. We argue that the Alliance, whose initial main aim was to identify AZEs&s, must be followed up by a second-generation initiative that directs and co-ordinates AZE conservation activities on the ground. The prominent role of zoos, conservation NGOs, and governmental institutions provides a combination of all-encompassing knowhow that can, if properly steered, maximize the long-term survival of AZEs&s.

No MeSH data available.


Body size distribution of AZE mammals and birds. Sizes are biased towards small and light birds, mammals with 92 and 79%, respectively, lighter than 1 kg, 65, and 56%, respectively, lighter than 100 g. All AZE amphibians and reptiles are lighter than 1 kg and are not shown here
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Fig2: Body size distribution of AZE mammals and birds. Sizes are biased towards small and light birds, mammals with 92 and 79%, respectively, lighter than 1 kg, 65, and 56%, respectively, lighter than 100 g. All AZE amphibians and reptiles are lighter than 1 kg and are not shown here

Mentions: It is clear that the AZE is an evolving project as species are added and some are lost to the list as they are declared extinct e.g. the Christmas Island pipistrelle (Pipistrellus murrayi) (Martin et al. 2012). Nonetheless, the remaining challenge is to protect and effectively manage AZEs&s, often in demanding geographical (rough terrain, remote sites) conditions, and restrictive geopolitical circumstances (corruption, insurgency, war) (Conde et al. 2015). However, AZE sites are relatively small (median size ~121 km2) compared to existing national parks and other protected areas (Ricketts et al. 2005; UNEP-WCMC 2016). This statistic, alongside the fact that most AZE species are relatively small-bodied animals (Fig. 2), may mean that despite the small area size of AZE sites, success is possible due to the universal relation of body size and landscape requirements (Thornton and Fletcher 2013). AZE species, being narrow-range endemics, generally inhabit reduced habitat spaces, and are thus less reliant on interconnected landscapes; management of wide-ranging species is much more difficult to achieve. Conservation of AZE species requires the protection of their sites, which we argue is relatively cheap if the political will at an international, national and local level exists. To this end, awareness building and a unified policy strategy by currently involved and to-be-involved organizations is crucial.Fig. 2


Meeting the Aichi targets: Pushing for zero extinction conservation
Body size distribution of AZE mammals and birds. Sizes are biased towards small and light birds, mammals with 92 and 79%, respectively, lighter than 1 kg, 65, and 56%, respectively, lighter than 100 g. All AZE amphibians and reptiles are lighter than 1 kg and are not shown here
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385670&req=5

Fig2: Body size distribution of AZE mammals and birds. Sizes are biased towards small and light birds, mammals with 92 and 79%, respectively, lighter than 1 kg, 65, and 56%, respectively, lighter than 100 g. All AZE amphibians and reptiles are lighter than 1 kg and are not shown here
Mentions: It is clear that the AZE is an evolving project as species are added and some are lost to the list as they are declared extinct e.g. the Christmas Island pipistrelle (Pipistrellus murrayi) (Martin et al. 2012). Nonetheless, the remaining challenge is to protect and effectively manage AZEs&s, often in demanding geographical (rough terrain, remote sites) conditions, and restrictive geopolitical circumstances (corruption, insurgency, war) (Conde et al. 2015). However, AZE sites are relatively small (median size ~121 km2) compared to existing national parks and other protected areas (Ricketts et al. 2005; UNEP-WCMC 2016). This statistic, alongside the fact that most AZE species are relatively small-bodied animals (Fig. 2), may mean that despite the small area size of AZE sites, success is possible due to the universal relation of body size and landscape requirements (Thornton and Fletcher 2013). AZE species, being narrow-range endemics, generally inhabit reduced habitat spaces, and are thus less reliant on interconnected landscapes; management of wide-ranging species is much more difficult to achieve. Conservation of AZE species requires the protection of their sites, which we argue is relatively cheap if the political will at an international, national and local level exists. To this end, awareness building and a unified policy strategy by currently involved and to-be-involved organizations is crucial.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Effective protection of the ~19 000 IUCN-listed threatened species has never been more pressing. Ensuring the survival of the most vulnerable and irreplaceable taxa and places, such as those identified by the Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) species and their associated sites (AZEs&s), is an excellent opportunity to achieve the Aichi 2020 Targets T11 (protected areas) and T12 (preventing species extinctions). AZE taxa have small, single-site populations that are especially vulnerable to human-induced extinctions, particularly for the many amphibians. We show that AZEs&s can be protected feasibly and cost-effectively, but action is urgent. We argue that the Alliance, whose initial main aim was to identify AZEs&s, must be followed up by a second-generation initiative that directs and co-ordinates AZE conservation activities on the ground. The prominent role of zoos, conservation NGOs, and governmental institutions provides a combination of all-encompassing knowhow that can, if properly steered, maximize the long-term survival of AZEs&s.

No MeSH data available.