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A post-publication analysis of the idealized upper reference value of 2.5   mIU/L for TSH: Time to support the thyroid axis with magnesium and iron especially in the setting of reproduction medicine

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Laboratory medicine approaches the evaluation of thyroid function mostly through the single determination of the blood level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Some authors have suggested an upper reference value for TSH of 2.5 mIU/L. This suggestion has not been confirmed by recent clinical studies. These studies have delivered a clinically valid reference range going from 0.3 to 3.5 mIU/L. These values are valid for both for the general population as well as in the setting of fertility and pregnancy.

Current biochemical evidence about the elements required to maintain thyroid function shows that these not only include dietary iodine but also magnesium, iron, selenium and coenzyme Q10. Iron is important for the synthesis of thyroid peroxidase; magnesium-ATP contributes to the active process of iodine uptake; iodine has to be sufficiently present in the diet; selenium acts through selenoproteins to protect the thyroid cell during hormone synthesis and in deiodination of thyroxine; coenzyme Q10 influences thyroid vascularity. As a consequence, good clinical practice requires additional biochemical information on the blood levels of magnesium, selenium, coenzyme Q10 as well as iron status.

Since these elements are also important for the maintenance of reproductive function, we postulate that they constitute the connecting link between both endocrine systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The elements involved in thyroid function.
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f0005: The elements involved in thyroid function.

Mentions: We firmly believe that medical work in the field of thyroid disease and fertility should rely on clinically validated reference values for TSH as well as on extended biochemical analyses that evaluate iron and magnesium parameters Fig. 1.


A post-publication analysis of the idealized upper reference value of 2.5   mIU/L for TSH: Time to support the thyroid axis with magnesium and iron especially in the setting of reproduction medicine
The elements involved in thyroid function.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385584&req=5

f0005: The elements involved in thyroid function.
Mentions: We firmly believe that medical work in the field of thyroid disease and fertility should rely on clinically validated reference values for TSH as well as on extended biochemical analyses that evaluate iron and magnesium parameters Fig. 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Laboratory medicine approaches the evaluation of thyroid function mostly through the single determination of the blood level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Some authors have suggested an upper reference value for TSH of 2.5 mIU/L. This suggestion has not been confirmed by recent clinical studies. These studies have delivered a clinically valid reference range going from 0.3 to 3.5 mIU/L. These values are valid for both for the general population as well as in the setting of fertility and pregnancy.

Current biochemical evidence about the elements required to maintain thyroid function shows that these not only include dietary iodine but also magnesium, iron, selenium and coenzyme Q10. Iron is important for the synthesis of thyroid peroxidase; magnesium-ATP contributes to the active process of iodine uptake; iodine has to be sufficiently present in the diet; selenium acts through selenoproteins to protect the thyroid cell during hormone synthesis and in deiodination of thyroxine; coenzyme Q10 influences thyroid vascularity. As a consequence, good clinical practice requires additional biochemical information on the blood levels of magnesium, selenium, coenzyme Q10 as well as iron status.

Since these elements are also important for the maintenance of reproductive function, we postulate that they constitute the connecting link between both endocrine systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus