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Demonstration of nanoimprinted hyperlens array for high-throughput sub-diffraction imaging

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Overcoming the resolution limit of conventional optics is regarded as the most important issue in optical imaging science and technology. Although hyperlenses, super-resolution imaging devices based on highly anisotropic dispersion relations that allow the access of high-wavevector components, have recently achieved far-field sub-diffraction imaging in real-time, the previously demonstrated devices have suffered from the extreme difficulties of both the fabrication process and the non-artificial objects placement. This results in restrictions on the practical applications of the hyperlens devices. While implementing large-scale hyperlens arrays in conventional microscopy is desirable to solve such issues, it has not been feasible to fabricate such large-scale hyperlens array with the previously used nanofabrication methods. Here, we suggest a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large-scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. We fabricate a 5 cm × 5 cm size hyperlenses array and experimentally demonstrate that it can resolve sub-diffraction features down to 160 nm under 410 nm wavelength visible light. The array-based hyperlens device will provide a simple solution for much more practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging which can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology and other closely related interdisciplinary fields.

No MeSH data available.


AFM analysis of the master stamp and the replicated substrate for hyperlens array.(a–c) 3D AFM images of the fabricated patterns on (a) master stamp and (b,c) replicated substrate. The shape has a depth of 1.7 μm and a diameter of 2.5 μm. (d–e) AFM graph data of the fabricated patterns on the quartz substrate, master stamp (d) and replicated substrate (e), respectively. (f) XPS depth-profiling data of the HAHS-patterned quartz substrate. The carbon signal only exists near the surface region.
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f5: AFM analysis of the master stamp and the replicated substrate for hyperlens array.(a–c) 3D AFM images of the fabricated patterns on (a) master stamp and (b,c) replicated substrate. The shape has a depth of 1.7 μm and a diameter of 2.5 μm. (d–e) AFM graph data of the fabricated patterns on the quartz substrate, master stamp (d) and replicated substrate (e), respectively. (f) XPS depth-profiling data of the HAHS-patterned quartz substrate. The carbon signal only exists near the surface region.

Mentions: Figure 5 displays the AFM and the XPS analysis. The AFM data of the patterns on a replicated substrate, shown in Fig. 5(b) and (e), describes hemispherical structures with 1.7 μm depth and 2.5 μm diameter, which are identical to the AFM data of the master stamp shown in Fig. 5(a) and (d). The AFM data of the replicated patterns array is shown in Fig. 5(c). The XPS analysis graph of the replicated patterns on the quartz substrate (Fig. 5(f)) proves that the composition ratio of the patterned layer and the quartz substrate are equal. As a result, the components and optical properties of the replicated patterns are same as those of the master stamp.


Demonstration of nanoimprinted hyperlens array for high-throughput sub-diffraction imaging
AFM analysis of the master stamp and the replicated substrate for hyperlens array.(a–c) 3D AFM images of the fabricated patterns on (a) master stamp and (b,c) replicated substrate. The shape has a depth of 1.7 μm and a diameter of 2.5 μm. (d–e) AFM graph data of the fabricated patterns on the quartz substrate, master stamp (d) and replicated substrate (e), respectively. (f) XPS depth-profiling data of the HAHS-patterned quartz substrate. The carbon signal only exists near the surface region.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385565&req=5

f5: AFM analysis of the master stamp and the replicated substrate for hyperlens array.(a–c) 3D AFM images of the fabricated patterns on (a) master stamp and (b,c) replicated substrate. The shape has a depth of 1.7 μm and a diameter of 2.5 μm. (d–e) AFM graph data of the fabricated patterns on the quartz substrate, master stamp (d) and replicated substrate (e), respectively. (f) XPS depth-profiling data of the HAHS-patterned quartz substrate. The carbon signal only exists near the surface region.
Mentions: Figure 5 displays the AFM and the XPS analysis. The AFM data of the patterns on a replicated substrate, shown in Fig. 5(b) and (e), describes hemispherical structures with 1.7 μm depth and 2.5 μm diameter, which are identical to the AFM data of the master stamp shown in Fig. 5(a) and (d). The AFM data of the replicated patterns array is shown in Fig. 5(c). The XPS analysis graph of the replicated patterns on the quartz substrate (Fig. 5(f)) proves that the composition ratio of the patterned layer and the quartz substrate are equal. As a result, the components and optical properties of the replicated patterns are same as those of the master stamp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Overcoming the resolution limit of conventional optics is regarded as the most important issue in optical imaging science and technology. Although hyperlenses, super-resolution imaging devices based on highly anisotropic dispersion relations that allow the access of high-wavevector components, have recently achieved far-field sub-diffraction imaging in real-time, the previously demonstrated devices have suffered from the extreme difficulties of both the fabrication process and the non-artificial objects placement. This results in restrictions on the practical applications of the hyperlens devices. While implementing large-scale hyperlens arrays in conventional microscopy is desirable to solve such issues, it has not been feasible to fabricate such large-scale hyperlens array with the previously used nanofabrication methods. Here, we suggest a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large-scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. We fabricate a 5 cm × 5 cm size hyperlenses array and experimentally demonstrate that it can resolve sub-diffraction features down to 160 nm under 410 nm wavelength visible light. The array-based hyperlens device will provide a simple solution for much more practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging which can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology and other closely related interdisciplinary fields.

No MeSH data available.