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A Strategy for Precise Treatment of Cardiac Malignant Neoplasms

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of cardiac malignant neoplasms in the general population has been shown to be significant higher than what was previously estimated, yet their treatment has remained difficult and effective therapies are lacking. In the current study, we developed a novel thermotherapy in which PEG-functionalized carbon nanotubes were injected into the tumor regions to assist in the targeted delivery of infrared radiation energy with minimal hyperthermic damage to the surrounding normal tissues. In a mouse model of cardiac malignant neoplasms, the injected carbon nanotubes could rapidly induce coagulative necrosis of tumor tissues when exposed to infrared irradiation. In accordance, the treatment was also found to result in a restoration of heart functions and a concomitant increase of survival rate in mice. Taken together, our carbon nanotube-based thermotherapy successfully addressed the difficulty facing conventional laser ablation methods with regard to off-target thermal injury, and could pave the way for the development of more effective therapies against cardiac malignant neoplasms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The determination of safe temperature range.(a) Whole-body imaging by thermal camera showed that the temperature of the impacted cardiac tissues in the mice injected with carbon nanotubes (left) was significantly higher than that in the control (right); (b) Time course of temperature increase in the irradiation zone for both the treatment group and the control group; (c) The two-month survival rates at treatment temperatures from 41 to 50 °C.
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f2: The determination of safe temperature range.(a) Whole-body imaging by thermal camera showed that the temperature of the impacted cardiac tissues in the mice injected with carbon nanotubes (left) was significantly higher than that in the control (right); (b) Time course of temperature increase in the irradiation zone for both the treatment group and the control group; (c) The two-month survival rates at treatment temperatures from 41 to 50 °C.

Mentions: Whole-body imaging by thermal camera confirmed that the injected carbon nanotubes could efficiently absorb infrared radiation and convert its energy to heat, which was subsequently delivered to the neighboring tissues through thermal conduction leading to local hyperthermia (Fig. 2a). The temperature of the impacted murine heart tissues was linearly increased to around 50 °C within 60 s as a result of the laser treatment when carbon nanotubes were administered. In contrast, the control group showed a much smaller increase of temperature around the irradiated region (P = 0.014, Fig. 2b & Table S1). The two-month survival rate for the treatment group began to decline once the target temperature of the thermotherapy exceeded 48 °C (Fig. 2c). Taken together, we concluded that the acceptable range of target temperature for treating cardiac neoplasms should be from 41 to 47 °C.


A Strategy for Precise Treatment of Cardiac Malignant Neoplasms
The determination of safe temperature range.(a) Whole-body imaging by thermal camera showed that the temperature of the impacted cardiac tissues in the mice injected with carbon nanotubes (left) was significantly higher than that in the control (right); (b) Time course of temperature increase in the irradiation zone for both the treatment group and the control group; (c) The two-month survival rates at treatment temperatures from 41 to 50 °C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385561&req=5

f2: The determination of safe temperature range.(a) Whole-body imaging by thermal camera showed that the temperature of the impacted cardiac tissues in the mice injected with carbon nanotubes (left) was significantly higher than that in the control (right); (b) Time course of temperature increase in the irradiation zone for both the treatment group and the control group; (c) The two-month survival rates at treatment temperatures from 41 to 50 °C.
Mentions: Whole-body imaging by thermal camera confirmed that the injected carbon nanotubes could efficiently absorb infrared radiation and convert its energy to heat, which was subsequently delivered to the neighboring tissues through thermal conduction leading to local hyperthermia (Fig. 2a). The temperature of the impacted murine heart tissues was linearly increased to around 50 °C within 60 s as a result of the laser treatment when carbon nanotubes were administered. In contrast, the control group showed a much smaller increase of temperature around the irradiated region (P = 0.014, Fig. 2b & Table S1). The two-month survival rate for the treatment group began to decline once the target temperature of the thermotherapy exceeded 48 °C (Fig. 2c). Taken together, we concluded that the acceptable range of target temperature for treating cardiac neoplasms should be from 41 to 47 °C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of cardiac malignant neoplasms in the general population has been shown to be significant higher than what was previously estimated, yet their treatment has remained difficult and effective therapies are lacking. In the current study, we developed a novel thermotherapy in which PEG-functionalized carbon nanotubes were injected into the tumor regions to assist in the targeted delivery of infrared radiation energy with minimal hyperthermic damage to the surrounding normal tissues. In a mouse model of cardiac malignant neoplasms, the injected carbon nanotubes could rapidly induce coagulative necrosis of tumor tissues when exposed to infrared irradiation. In accordance, the treatment was also found to result in a restoration of heart functions and a concomitant increase of survival rate in mice. Taken together, our carbon nanotube-based thermotherapy successfully addressed the difficulty facing conventional laser ablation methods with regard to off-target thermal injury, and could pave the way for the development of more effective therapies against cardiac malignant neoplasms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus