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Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event

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ABSTRACT

A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80 km long, 40 km wide and 1.2 km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km3 placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimated as ~1.1 Ma. Thin layers of the volcanic material related to the eruption had been identified in sedimentary cores located about 1000 km away from the Gakkel Ridge. The Gakkel Ridge Caldera is the single example of a supervolcano in the rift zone of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge System.

No MeSH data available.


Paleomagnetic correlation with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale2425 on sedimentary core KD12-03-10C.The mean sedimentation rates have been determined for each paleomagnetic chron based on the established paleomagnetic boundaries, and related age2627. Yellow circles mark abnormally high values of the magnetic susceptibility, and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). See Fig. 1a for location.
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f5: Paleomagnetic correlation with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale2425 on sedimentary core KD12-03-10C.The mean sedimentation rates have been determined for each paleomagnetic chron based on the established paleomagnetic boundaries, and related age2627. Yellow circles mark abnormally high values of the magnetic susceptibility, and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). See Fig. 1a for location.

Mentions: Even more valuable information on the specifics of the Pliocene-Quaternary sedimentation was obtained from core KD12-03-10C extracted on the Mendeleev Rise in 2012 (see Fig. 1a for location)11. The 6 m-long core represents the time interval down to ≈4 Ma (Gilbert paleomagnetic chron) - Fig. 5.


Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event
Paleomagnetic correlation with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale2425 on sedimentary core KD12-03-10C.The mean sedimentation rates have been determined for each paleomagnetic chron based on the established paleomagnetic boundaries, and related age2627. Yellow circles mark abnormally high values of the magnetic susceptibility, and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). See Fig. 1a for location.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385544&req=5

f5: Paleomagnetic correlation with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale2425 on sedimentary core KD12-03-10C.The mean sedimentation rates have been determined for each paleomagnetic chron based on the established paleomagnetic boundaries, and related age2627. Yellow circles mark abnormally high values of the magnetic susceptibility, and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). See Fig. 1a for location.
Mentions: Even more valuable information on the specifics of the Pliocene-Quaternary sedimentation was obtained from core KD12-03-10C extracted on the Mendeleev Rise in 2012 (see Fig. 1a for location)11. The 6 m-long core represents the time interval down to ≈4 Ma (Gilbert paleomagnetic chron) - Fig. 5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80 km long, 40 km wide and 1.2 km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km3 placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimated as ~1.1 Ma. Thin layers of the volcanic material related to the eruption had been identified in sedimentary cores located about 1000 km away from the Gakkel Ridge. The Gakkel Ridge Caldera is the single example of a supervolcano in the rift zone of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge System.

No MeSH data available.