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Characteristics of orbital wall fractures in preschool and school-aged children

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the injury patterns in pediatric patients with an orbital wall fracture (OWF) and to identify the differences in injury patterns between preschool and school-aged patients with OWF who presented to the emergency department.

Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study in the emergency department of a tertiary hospital between January 2004 and March 2014. A total of 177 pediatric patients (<18 years) with OWF who underwent facial bone computed tomography scans with specific discharge codes were included. Patients were categorized into preschool (≤7 years) and school-aged (>7 years) pediatric groups.

Results: The inferior wall was the most common fracture site in both the preschool and school-aged pediatric groups (50.0% vs. 64.4%, P=0.15). The male-to-female ratio and the mechanism of injury showed significant differences between the two age groups. Violence was the most common mechanism of injury in the school-aged pediatric group (49.3%), whereas falls from a height caused OWF in approximately half of the patients in the preschool pediatric group (42.9%). Concomitant injuries and facial fractures had a tendency to occur more frequently in the school-aged pediatric group.

Conclusion: Significant differences according to the sex and mechanisms of injury were identified in preschool and school-aged pediatric patients with OWF.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The site of orbital wall fracture according to mechanism of injury. Mechanism of injury including violence, traffic accident, ground level falls, and falls from heights were listed in order of frequency.
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f1-ceem-16-153: The site of orbital wall fracture according to mechanism of injury. Mechanism of injury including violence, traffic accident, ground level falls, and falls from heights were listed in order of frequency.

Mentions: There were differences in the mechanisms of injury between the two groups. Violence was the most common mechanism of injury in the school-aged pediatric group (49.3%) and it tended to occur more commonly in middle and high school-aged pediatric groups. In contrast, violence was the least common mechanism of injury in the preschool pediatric group (4.0%, P<0.001). Approximately half of the OWFs in the preschool pediatric group (48.0%) resulted from falls from a height, whereas falls from a height caused OWFs in only two of 149 patients (1.3%) in the school-aged pediatric group (P<0.001). The site of OWF according to the mechanism of injury is presented in Fig. 1. Multiple OWFs were observed in patients injured in traffic accidents (total, 43.3%; preschool pediatric group, 40.0%; school-aged pediatric group, 44.0%) and falls from height (total, 28.6%; preschool pediatric group, 16.7%; school-aged pediatric group, 100.0%). No significant differences in regard to clinical signs and symptoms were noted between the two groups; the most common sign was periorbital swelling (100% vs. 86.8%, P=0.08), followed by ecchymosis (72.0% vs. 50.0%, P=0.04), and emphysema (12.0% vs. 19.1%, P=0.58).


Characteristics of orbital wall fractures in preschool and school-aged children
The site of orbital wall fracture according to mechanism of injury. Mechanism of injury including violence, traffic accident, ground level falls, and falls from heights were listed in order of frequency.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5385511&req=5

f1-ceem-16-153: The site of orbital wall fracture according to mechanism of injury. Mechanism of injury including violence, traffic accident, ground level falls, and falls from heights were listed in order of frequency.
Mentions: There were differences in the mechanisms of injury between the two groups. Violence was the most common mechanism of injury in the school-aged pediatric group (49.3%) and it tended to occur more commonly in middle and high school-aged pediatric groups. In contrast, violence was the least common mechanism of injury in the preschool pediatric group (4.0%, P<0.001). Approximately half of the OWFs in the preschool pediatric group (48.0%) resulted from falls from a height, whereas falls from a height caused OWFs in only two of 149 patients (1.3%) in the school-aged pediatric group (P<0.001). The site of OWF according to the mechanism of injury is presented in Fig. 1. Multiple OWFs were observed in patients injured in traffic accidents (total, 43.3%; preschool pediatric group, 40.0%; school-aged pediatric group, 44.0%) and falls from height (total, 28.6%; preschool pediatric group, 16.7%; school-aged pediatric group, 100.0%). No significant differences in regard to clinical signs and symptoms were noted between the two groups; the most common sign was periorbital swelling (100% vs. 86.8%, P=0.08), followed by ecchymosis (72.0% vs. 50.0%, P=0.04), and emphysema (12.0% vs. 19.1%, P=0.58).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the injury patterns in pediatric patients with an orbital wall fracture (OWF) and to identify the differences in injury patterns between preschool and school-aged patients with OWF who presented to the emergency department.

Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study in the emergency department of a tertiary hospital between January 2004 and March 2014. A total of 177 pediatric patients (&lt;18 years) with OWF who underwent facial bone computed tomography scans with specific discharge codes were included. Patients were categorized into preschool (&le;7 years) and school-aged (&gt;7 years) pediatric groups.

Results: The inferior wall was the most common fracture site in both the preschool and school-aged pediatric groups (50.0% vs. 64.4%, P=0.15). The male-to-female ratio and the mechanism of injury showed significant differences between the two age groups. Violence was the most common mechanism of injury in the school-aged pediatric group (49.3%), whereas falls from a height caused OWF in approximately half of the patients in the preschool pediatric group (42.9%). Concomitant injuries and facial fractures had a tendency to occur more frequently in the school-aged pediatric group.

Conclusion: Significant differences according to the sex and mechanisms of injury were identified in preschool and school-aged pediatric patients with OWF.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus