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A retrospective epidemiological study of skin diseases among pediatric population attending a tertiary dermatology referral center in Northern Greece

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence of skin diseases in children is influenced by hereditary, social, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of pediatric dermatoses at a University Hospital in Northern Greece.

Patients and methods: We reviewed epidemiologic data of 940 patients, aged 0–18 years, who were referred to the outpatient clinic of a University Hospital between January 2013 and December 2015. Demographic data and the frequency of the various diagnoses in various age groups were studied.

Results: Nine hundred and forty children and adolescents with 1020 diagnoses were included in the study (52.8% females and 47.2% males). The 10 most frequent diagnoses were: dermatitis/eczema (31.5%), viral infections (12.5%), pigmentary disorders (7.4%), melanocytic nevi (5.8%), alopecia areata (5.8%), acne (5.6%), nail disorders (3.3%), vascular malformations and hemangiomas (2.9%), psoriasis (2.6%), and bacterial infections (2.6%). Atopic dermatitis was the most prevalent dermatosis in all age groups accounting for a total of 20.9% of the study population. A remarkably high incidence of various forms of mastocytosis (2.2%) was seen in our data.

Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis is the most frequent pediatric dermatosis in all age groups. Viral infections, pigmentary disorders, and nevi account for a significant proportion of the referrals. The high incidence of mastocytosis in our study may be attributed to overdiagnosis, overestimation due to the relatively small study population, or it may represent the real incidence of mastocytosis in our region. The low incidence of acne in our study may be attributed to the fact that only severe cases are referred to our hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Types of viral infections by age group (number).Abbreviation: HFMD, hand, foot, and mouth disease.
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f2-ccid-10-099: Types of viral infections by age group (number).Abbreviation: HFMD, hand, foot, and mouth disease.

Mentions: Viral infections were found to be the second most common dermatosis having been diagnosed in 12.5% of the study population. Warts were seen in the majority of these cases (58.9%), whereas the remainder was diagnosed with molloscum contagiosum (27%) and viral exanthems (varicella, exanthema subitum, erythema infectiosum, herpes zoster, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), and Gianotti–Crosti syndrome). Molloscum contagiosum was predominantly seen in infants and preschoolers whereas the incidence of warts peaked in the scholar and teenage years (Figure 2). The incidence of HFMD and subsequent onychomadesis were 10.6%. Two cases of Gianotti–Crosti syndrome associated with Epstein–Barr virus infection were diagnosed.


A retrospective epidemiological study of skin diseases among pediatric population attending a tertiary dermatology referral center in Northern Greece
Types of viral infections by age group (number).Abbreviation: HFMD, hand, foot, and mouth disease.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384684&req=5

f2-ccid-10-099: Types of viral infections by age group (number).Abbreviation: HFMD, hand, foot, and mouth disease.
Mentions: Viral infections were found to be the second most common dermatosis having been diagnosed in 12.5% of the study population. Warts were seen in the majority of these cases (58.9%), whereas the remainder was diagnosed with molloscum contagiosum (27%) and viral exanthems (varicella, exanthema subitum, erythema infectiosum, herpes zoster, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), and Gianotti–Crosti syndrome). Molloscum contagiosum was predominantly seen in infants and preschoolers whereas the incidence of warts peaked in the scholar and teenage years (Figure 2). The incidence of HFMD and subsequent onychomadesis were 10.6%. Two cases of Gianotti–Crosti syndrome associated with Epstein–Barr virus infection were diagnosed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence of skin diseases in children is influenced by hereditary, social, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of pediatric dermatoses at a University Hospital in Northern Greece.

Patients and methods: We reviewed epidemiologic data of 940 patients, aged 0–18 years, who were referred to the outpatient clinic of a University Hospital between January 2013 and December 2015. Demographic data and the frequency of the various diagnoses in various age groups were studied.

Results: Nine hundred and forty children and adolescents with 1020 diagnoses were included in the study (52.8% females and 47.2% males). The 10 most frequent diagnoses were: dermatitis/eczema (31.5%), viral infections (12.5%), pigmentary disorders (7.4%), melanocytic nevi (5.8%), alopecia areata (5.8%), acne (5.6%), nail disorders (3.3%), vascular malformations and hemangiomas (2.9%), psoriasis (2.6%), and bacterial infections (2.6%). Atopic dermatitis was the most prevalent dermatosis in all age groups accounting for a total of 20.9% of the study population. A remarkably high incidence of various forms of mastocytosis (2.2%) was seen in our data.

Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis is the most frequent pediatric dermatosis in all age groups. Viral infections, pigmentary disorders, and nevi account for a significant proportion of the referrals. The high incidence of mastocytosis in our study may be attributed to overdiagnosis, overestimation due to the relatively small study population, or it may represent the real incidence of mastocytosis in our region. The low incidence of acne in our study may be attributed to the fact that only severe cases are referred to our hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus