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Should biomedical research be like Airbnb?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The thesis presented here is that biomedical research is based on the trusted exchange of services. That exchange would be conducted more efficiently if the trusted software platforms to exchange those services, if they exist, were more integrated. While simpler and narrower in scope than the services governing biomedical research, comparison to existing internet-based platforms, like Airbnb, can be informative. We illustrate how the analogy to internet-based platforms works and does not work and introduce The Commons, under active development at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and elsewhere, as an example of the move towards platforms for research.

No MeSH data available.


Example platforms currently supporting biomedical research.
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pbio.2001818.g002: Example platforms currently supporting biomedical research.

Mentions: Is there a Ford, an Apple, or a philanthropist for that matter, willing to make the investment in developing a platform for biomedical research that embraces all the needed exchanges? It would seem that the answer is no. Certainly, in academia there is neither the incentives—it won’t bring you tenure—nor long-term funding to undertake such an endeavor. Rather, we have a situation where government funders, foundations, and the private sector have each invested in a small piece of what is needed (Fig 2). It is conceivable that one or more commercial entities could become the platform provider. Some publishers are indeed moving in this direction to satisfy a vertical market through a larger part of the scholarly workflow. There would certainly be resistance by some to this commercialization. Moreover, what is required to succeed would seem beyond the capabilities of any company, and an open and collaborative system built by scientists for scientists would seem to have the most likelihood of success.


Should biomedical research be like Airbnb?
Example platforms currently supporting biomedical research.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384655&req=5

pbio.2001818.g002: Example platforms currently supporting biomedical research.
Mentions: Is there a Ford, an Apple, or a philanthropist for that matter, willing to make the investment in developing a platform for biomedical research that embraces all the needed exchanges? It would seem that the answer is no. Certainly, in academia there is neither the incentives—it won’t bring you tenure—nor long-term funding to undertake such an endeavor. Rather, we have a situation where government funders, foundations, and the private sector have each invested in a small piece of what is needed (Fig 2). It is conceivable that one or more commercial entities could become the platform provider. Some publishers are indeed moving in this direction to satisfy a vertical market through a larger part of the scholarly workflow. There would certainly be resistance by some to this commercialization. Moreover, what is required to succeed would seem beyond the capabilities of any company, and an open and collaborative system built by scientists for scientists would seem to have the most likelihood of success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The thesis presented here is that biomedical research is based on the trusted exchange of services. That exchange would be conducted more efficiently if the trusted software platforms to exchange those services, if they exist, were more integrated. While simpler and narrower in scope than the services governing biomedical research, comparison to existing internet-based platforms, like Airbnb, can be informative. We illustrate how the analogy to internet-based platforms works and does not work and introduce The Commons, under active development at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and elsewhere, as an example of the move towards platforms for research.

No MeSH data available.