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Intraperitoneal Injection Is Not a Suitable Administration Route for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Biomedical Applications

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Given the extensive application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields, there is increasing concern regarding unintentional health impacts. Research into safe usage is therefore increasingly necessary. This study investigated the responses of the mouse brain to single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) delivered via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and compared these results with the previous study where SWCNTs were delivered via intravenous (IV) injection so as to explore which administration route is potentially better for SWCNTs application. This study suggests SWCNTs delivered via IP injection can have negative effects on the mouse brain through oxidative stress and inflammation at high concentration exposure, but these responses were not consistent and showed no dose-dependent effect. In a previous study, the results showed that IV-delivered SWCNTs induced a more consistent and dose-dependent effect. The comparison of the 2 studies suggested that using SWCNTs at a safe dosage delivered via IV injection may be a better administration route for SWCNTs in biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The possible molecular mechanism of SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain. The SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain occurs through enhancing ROS generation. Oxidative stress then induces cell damage in the brain, whereas treatment with ascorbic acid may protect cells by decreasing oxidative stress. This figure was produced by Xudong Liu. SWCNTs indicates single-walled carbon nanotube; ROS, reactive oxygen species.
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fig7-1559325816681320: The possible molecular mechanism of SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain. The SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain occurs through enhancing ROS generation. Oxidative stress then induces cell damage in the brain, whereas treatment with ascorbic acid may protect cells by decreasing oxidative stress. This figure was produced by Xudong Liu. SWCNTs indicates single-walled carbon nanotube; ROS, reactive oxygen species.

Mentions: This study found that after exposing mice to SWCNTs via IP injection, the pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region were damaged and that Nissl substance loss occurred in pyramidal cells. Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation were also seen in the mouse brain (Figure 7).


Intraperitoneal Injection Is Not a Suitable Administration Route for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Biomedical Applications
The possible molecular mechanism of SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain. The SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain occurs through enhancing ROS generation. Oxidative stress then induces cell damage in the brain, whereas treatment with ascorbic acid may protect cells by decreasing oxidative stress. This figure was produced by Xudong Liu. SWCNTs indicates single-walled carbon nanotube; ROS, reactive oxygen species.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384492&req=5

fig7-1559325816681320: The possible molecular mechanism of SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain. The SWCNTs-induced damage in the mouse brain occurs through enhancing ROS generation. Oxidative stress then induces cell damage in the brain, whereas treatment with ascorbic acid may protect cells by decreasing oxidative stress. This figure was produced by Xudong Liu. SWCNTs indicates single-walled carbon nanotube; ROS, reactive oxygen species.
Mentions: This study found that after exposing mice to SWCNTs via IP injection, the pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region were damaged and that Nissl substance loss occurred in pyramidal cells. Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation were also seen in the mouse brain (Figure 7).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Given the extensive application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields, there is increasing concern regarding unintentional health impacts. Research into safe usage is therefore increasingly necessary. This study investigated the responses of the mouse brain to single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) delivered via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and compared these results with the previous study where SWCNTs were delivered via intravenous (IV) injection so as to explore which administration route is potentially better for SWCNTs application. This study suggests SWCNTs delivered via IP injection can have negative effects on the mouse brain through oxidative stress and inflammation at high concentration exposure, but these responses were not consistent and showed no dose-dependent effect. In a previous study, the results showed that IV-delivered SWCNTs induced a more consistent and dose-dependent effect. The comparison of the 2 studies suggested that using SWCNTs at a safe dosage delivered via IV injection may be a better administration route for SWCNTs in biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus