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Intraperitoneal Injection Is Not a Suitable Administration Route for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Biomedical Applications

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ABSTRACT

Given the extensive application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields, there is increasing concern regarding unintentional health impacts. Research into safe usage is therefore increasingly necessary. This study investigated the responses of the mouse brain to single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) delivered via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and compared these results with the previous study where SWCNTs were delivered via intravenous (IV) injection so as to explore which administration route is potentially better for SWCNTs application. This study suggests SWCNTs delivered via IP injection can have negative effects on the mouse brain through oxidative stress and inflammation at high concentration exposure, but these responses were not consistent and showed no dose-dependent effect. In a previous study, the results showed that IV-delivered SWCNTs induced a more consistent and dose-dependent effect. The comparison of the 2 studies suggested that using SWCNTs at a safe dosage delivered via IV injection may be a better administration route for SWCNTs in biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Characterization of SWCNTs. These characterization data indicated that the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments. SWCNTs indicate single-walled carbon nanotubes.
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fig1-1559325816681320: Characterization of SWCNTs. These characterization data indicated that the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments. SWCNTs indicate single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Mentions: Scanning electron microscopy and TEM showed that the SWCNTs in our study comprised a smooth single-walled tube structure. The main metal catalysts in the SWCNTs samples were tested using XPS analysis (Figure S1). Raman spectral measurement (514-nm excitation wavelength) showed that G/D ratios were 15.64, and the Raman radial breathing mode peak analysis indicated that the diameter of the SWCNTs ranged from 0.88 to 1.56 nm (Figure S2). The AFM image shows that the diameter of the SWCNTs was around 1.0 nm and the length of the SWCNTs was around 1.38 μm (Figure S3). The biological effects of nanomaterials are related to their properties. The SWCNTs we used were the same as those used in our previous study. As shown by our data, the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments (Figure 1).


Intraperitoneal Injection Is Not a Suitable Administration Route for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Biomedical Applications
Characterization of SWCNTs. These characterization data indicated that the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments. SWCNTs indicate single-walled carbon nanotubes.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384492&req=5

fig1-1559325816681320: Characterization of SWCNTs. These characterization data indicated that the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments. SWCNTs indicate single-walled carbon nanotubes.
Mentions: Scanning electron microscopy and TEM showed that the SWCNTs in our study comprised a smooth single-walled tube structure. The main metal catalysts in the SWCNTs samples were tested using XPS analysis (Figure S1). Raman spectral measurement (514-nm excitation wavelength) showed that G/D ratios were 15.64, and the Raman radial breathing mode peak analysis indicated that the diameter of the SWCNTs ranged from 0.88 to 1.56 nm (Figure S2). The AFM image shows that the diameter of the SWCNTs was around 1.0 nm and the length of the SWCNTs was around 1.38 μm (Figure S3). The biological effects of nanomaterials are related to their properties. The SWCNTs we used were the same as those used in our previous study. As shown by our data, the quality of these SWCNTs perfectly met the requirements of the experiments (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Given the extensive application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields, there is increasing concern regarding unintentional health impacts. Research into safe usage is therefore increasingly necessary. This study investigated the responses of the mouse brain to single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) delivered via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and compared these results with the previous study where SWCNTs were delivered via intravenous (IV) injection so as to explore which administration route is potentially better for SWCNTs application. This study suggests SWCNTs delivered via IP injection can have negative effects on the mouse brain through oxidative stress and inflammation at high concentration exposure, but these responses were not consistent and showed no dose-dependent effect. In a previous study, the results showed that IV-delivered SWCNTs induced a more consistent and dose-dependent effect. The comparison of the 2 studies suggested that using SWCNTs at a safe dosage delivered via IV injection may be a better administration route for SWCNTs in biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.