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Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use for maize production in SSA a profitable proposition? Evidence from Nigeria

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Inorganic fertilizer use across Sub-Saharan Africa is generally considered to be low. Yet, the notion that fertilizer use is too low is predicated on the assumption that it is profitable to use rates higher than currently observed. There is, however, limited empirical evidence to support this. Using a nationally representative panel dataset, this paper empirically estimates the profitability of fertilizer use for maize production in Nigeria. We find that fertilizer use in Nigeria is not as low as conventional wisdom suggests. Low marginal physical product and high transportation costs significantly reduce the profitability of fertilizer use. Apart from reduced transportation costs, other constraints such as soil quality, timely access to the product, and availability of complementary inputs such as improved seeds, irrigation and credit, as well as good management practices are also necessary for sustained agricultural productivity improvements.

No MeSH data available.


The proportion of plots on which inorganic fertilizer is applied in Nigeria (2010 and 2012).
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f0005: The proportion of plots on which inorganic fertilizer is applied in Nigeria (2010 and 2012).

Mentions: Despite the numerous factors cited as responsible for low fertilizer use, there is limited empirical evidence on the nature and rationale for the actual patterns of observed fertilizer use rates across Nigeria’s diverse farming systems and cropping patterns. Fertilizer use and needs will naturally vary depending on agro ecological and market conditions, government policies, cropping systems, and fertilizer responsiveness. Fertilizer use in the north is typically higher than in southern states (Fig. 1). This is partly attributed to lower soil fertility (FFD, 2011, Smith et al., 1997), larger area cultivated, and the growth of high value crops such as vegetables and particular cereals in the region (Eboh et al., 2006). Additionally, northern states have traditionally provided greater fertilizer subsidies since the colonial era when administrations provided support for fertilizer use out of concerns over soil depletion and desertification (Mustapha, 2003).


Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use for maize production in SSA a profitable proposition? Evidence from Nigeria
The proportion of plots on which inorganic fertilizer is applied in Nigeria (2010 and 2012).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384440&req=5

f0005: The proportion of plots on which inorganic fertilizer is applied in Nigeria (2010 and 2012).
Mentions: Despite the numerous factors cited as responsible for low fertilizer use, there is limited empirical evidence on the nature and rationale for the actual patterns of observed fertilizer use rates across Nigeria’s diverse farming systems and cropping patterns. Fertilizer use and needs will naturally vary depending on agro ecological and market conditions, government policies, cropping systems, and fertilizer responsiveness. Fertilizer use in the north is typically higher than in southern states (Fig. 1). This is partly attributed to lower soil fertility (FFD, 2011, Smith et al., 1997), larger area cultivated, and the growth of high value crops such as vegetables and particular cereals in the region (Eboh et al., 2006). Additionally, northern states have traditionally provided greater fertilizer subsidies since the colonial era when administrations provided support for fertilizer use out of concerns over soil depletion and desertification (Mustapha, 2003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Inorganic fertilizer use across Sub-Saharan Africa is generally considered to be low. Yet, the notion that fertilizer use is too low is predicated on the assumption that it is profitable to use rates higher than currently observed. There is, however, limited empirical evidence to support this. Using a nationally representative panel dataset, this paper empirically estimates the profitability of fertilizer use for maize production in Nigeria. We find that fertilizer use in Nigeria is not as low as conventional wisdom suggests. Low marginal physical product and high transportation costs significantly reduce the profitability of fertilizer use. Apart from reduced transportation costs, other constraints such as soil quality, timely access to the product, and availability of complementary inputs such as improved seeds, irrigation and credit, as well as good management practices are also necessary for sustained agricultural productivity improvements.

No MeSH data available.