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Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households ’ income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa ☆

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ABSTRACT

This paper uses comparable income aggregates from 41 national household surveys from 22 countries to explore the patterns of income generation among rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to compare household income strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa with those in other regions. The paper seeks to understand how geography drives these strategies, focusing on the role of agricultural potential and distance to urban areas. Specialization in on-farm activities continues to be the norm in rural Africa, practiced by 52 percent of households (as opposed to 21 percent of households in other regions). Regardless of distance and integration in the urban context, when agro-climatic conditions are favorable, farming remains the occupation of choice for most households in the African countries for which the study has geographically explicit information. However, the paper finds no evidence that African households are on a different trajectory than households in other regions in terms of transitioning to non-agricultural based income strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Multinomial logit results: The effect of distance on income strategies, by agricultural potential (aridity) – Base category: Farm specialization.
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f0110: Multinomial logit results: The effect of distance on income strategies, by agricultural potential (aridity) – Base category: Farm specialization.

Mentions: Fig. 20 reports how the predicted probabilities of being in the diversified and in the main non-farm specialization categories change with distance. To convey the effect of distance separately for high and low potential areas, we graph predicted probability estimated at the 10th (solid line, low potential) and 90th (dashed line, high potential) percentile of the normalized aridity index. The same graphs are reported by distance to cities of different size (20 thousand plus, 100 thousand plus or 500 thousand plus inhabitants). Since one objective of the study is to characterize how (and which) households transition from agriculture to other sectors, we focus on the sectors that identify more engagement in activities outside of agriculture (non-agricultural wage specializers and non-agricultural self-employment specializers), as well as on diversified households, as these constitute a significant share of the total (Table 3). It should be noted that since the sum of the probabilities of households falling into any of the six diversification/specialization categories is equal to one, one should interpret the trends in the three reported categories as the mirror image of the probability of being in one of the other categories, with farming attracting the lion’s share of specializing households (again, refer to Table 3 for the distribution of household into these categories).


Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households ’ income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa ☆
Multinomial logit results: The effect of distance on income strategies, by agricultural potential (aridity) – Base category: Farm specialization.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384437&req=5

f0110: Multinomial logit results: The effect of distance on income strategies, by agricultural potential (aridity) – Base category: Farm specialization.
Mentions: Fig. 20 reports how the predicted probabilities of being in the diversified and in the main non-farm specialization categories change with distance. To convey the effect of distance separately for high and low potential areas, we graph predicted probability estimated at the 10th (solid line, low potential) and 90th (dashed line, high potential) percentile of the normalized aridity index. The same graphs are reported by distance to cities of different size (20 thousand plus, 100 thousand plus or 500 thousand plus inhabitants). Since one objective of the study is to characterize how (and which) households transition from agriculture to other sectors, we focus on the sectors that identify more engagement in activities outside of agriculture (non-agricultural wage specializers and non-agricultural self-employment specializers), as well as on diversified households, as these constitute a significant share of the total (Table 3). It should be noted that since the sum of the probabilities of households falling into any of the six diversification/specialization categories is equal to one, one should interpret the trends in the three reported categories as the mirror image of the probability of being in one of the other categories, with farming attracting the lion’s share of specializing households (again, refer to Table 3 for the distribution of household into these categories).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper uses comparable income aggregates from 41 national household surveys from 22 countries to explore the patterns of income generation among rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to compare household income strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa with those in other regions. The paper seeks to understand how geography drives these strategies, focusing on the role of agricultural potential and distance to urban areas. Specialization in on-farm activities continues to be the norm in rural Africa, practiced by 52 percent of households (as opposed to 21 percent of households in other regions). Regardless of distance and integration in the urban context, when agro-climatic conditions are favorable, farming remains the occupation of choice for most households in the African countries for which the study has geographically explicit information. However, the paper finds no evidence that African households are on a different trajectory than households in other regions in terms of transitioning to non-agricultural based income strategies.

No MeSH data available.