Limits...
Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households ’ income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa ☆

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper uses comparable income aggregates from 41 national household surveys from 22 countries to explore the patterns of income generation among rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to compare household income strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa with those in other regions. The paper seeks to understand how geography drives these strategies, focusing on the role of agricultural potential and distance to urban areas. Specialization in on-farm activities continues to be the norm in rural Africa, practiced by 52 percent of households (as opposed to 21 percent of households in other regions). Regardless of distance and integration in the urban context, when agro-climatic conditions are favorable, farming remains the occupation of choice for most households in the African countries for which the study has geographically explicit information. However, the paper finds no evidence that African households are on a different trajectory than households in other regions in terms of transitioning to non-agricultural based income strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Share of total income from main income generating activities (Africa) by expenditure quintiles.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384437&req=5

f0080: Share of total income from main income generating activities (Africa) by expenditure quintiles.

Mentions: To explore the relationship across countries between rural income-generating activities and welfare, we start by examining activities by expenditure quintiles for each country. Fig. 16a charts income shares by expenditure quintile for all countries in the African sample. Focusing on on-farm activities, the darkest color, we see a sharp decrease in the share of on-farm income with increasing levels of welfare, dropping from around 50 percent of income in the poorest quintile in most countries, to less than 20 percent in the richest quintile. The drop in on-farm sources of income is made up by the increasing importance of off-farm (i.e. non-agricultural wage and self-employment) sources of income for better-off rural households. The clear trend evident from the countries in the African sample is not as clear in the non-African countries in Fig. 16b. Here Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Nepal, Pakistan and Tajikistan show the opposite trend: the share of on-farm activities increases with welfare.


Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households ’ income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa ☆
Share of total income from main income generating activities (Africa) by expenditure quintiles.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384437&req=5

f0080: Share of total income from main income generating activities (Africa) by expenditure quintiles.
Mentions: To explore the relationship across countries between rural income-generating activities and welfare, we start by examining activities by expenditure quintiles for each country. Fig. 16a charts income shares by expenditure quintile for all countries in the African sample. Focusing on on-farm activities, the darkest color, we see a sharp decrease in the share of on-farm income with increasing levels of welfare, dropping from around 50 percent of income in the poorest quintile in most countries, to less than 20 percent in the richest quintile. The drop in on-farm sources of income is made up by the increasing importance of off-farm (i.e. non-agricultural wage and self-employment) sources of income for better-off rural households. The clear trend evident from the countries in the African sample is not as clear in the non-African countries in Fig. 16b. Here Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Nepal, Pakistan and Tajikistan show the opposite trend: the share of on-farm activities increases with welfare.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper uses comparable income aggregates from 41 national household surveys from 22 countries to explore the patterns of income generation among rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to compare household income strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa with those in other regions. The paper seeks to understand how geography drives these strategies, focusing on the role of agricultural potential and distance to urban areas. Specialization in on-farm activities continues to be the norm in rural Africa, practiced by 52 percent of households (as opposed to 21 percent of households in other regions). Regardless of distance and integration in the urban context, when agro-climatic conditions are favorable, farming remains the occupation of choice for most households in the African countries for which the study has geographically explicit information. However, the paper finds no evidence that African households are on a different trajectory than households in other regions in terms of transitioning to non-agricultural based income strategies.

No MeSH data available.