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Agriculture in Africa – Telling myths from facts: A synthesis ☆

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stylized facts drive research agendas and policy debates. Yet robust stylized facts are hard to come by, and when available, often outdated. The 12 papers in this Special Issue revisit conventional wisdom on African agriculture and its farmers’ livelihoods using nationally representative surveys from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative in six African countries. At times they simply confirm our common understanding of the topic. But they also throw up a number of surprises, redirecting policy debates while fine-tuning others. Overall, the project calls for more attention to checking and updating our common wisdom. This requires nationally representative data, and sufficient incentives among researchers and policymakers alike. Without well-grounded stylized facts, they can easily be profoundly misguided.

No MeSH data available.


Enterprise productivity (Uganda) declines with distance from the urban center.
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f0045: Enterprise productivity (Uganda) declines with distance from the urban center.

Mentions: But obviously not all are just there for survival, and labor productivity differs widely. Especially rural and female-headed enterprises, those located further away from urban centers (Fig. 9), and businesses that operate intermittently display lower labor productivity compared with urban and male-owned enterprises, or enterprises that operate throughout the year. Rural enterprises exit the market primarily because of a lack of profitability or finance, and due to idiosyncratic shocks. Nonetheless, the authors also show that when the conditions are right, households can seize the opportunities for enhancing family income. When households are better educated and have access to credit, they engage in agribusiness and trade throughout the year—not just in survival mode. The policy challenge is to create a business climate to foster such activities, which remains a tall order.


Agriculture in Africa – Telling myths from facts: A synthesis ☆
Enterprise productivity (Uganda) declines with distance from the urban center.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384436&req=5

f0045: Enterprise productivity (Uganda) declines with distance from the urban center.
Mentions: But obviously not all are just there for survival, and labor productivity differs widely. Especially rural and female-headed enterprises, those located further away from urban centers (Fig. 9), and businesses that operate intermittently display lower labor productivity compared with urban and male-owned enterprises, or enterprises that operate throughout the year. Rural enterprises exit the market primarily because of a lack of profitability or finance, and due to idiosyncratic shocks. Nonetheless, the authors also show that when the conditions are right, households can seize the opportunities for enhancing family income. When households are better educated and have access to credit, they engage in agribusiness and trade throughout the year—not just in survival mode. The policy challenge is to create a business climate to foster such activities, which remains a tall order.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stylized facts drive research agendas and policy debates. Yet robust stylized facts are hard to come by, and when available, often outdated. The 12 papers in this Special Issue revisit conventional wisdom on African agriculture and its farmers’ livelihoods using nationally representative surveys from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative in six African countries. At times they simply confirm our common understanding of the topic. But they also throw up a number of surprises, redirecting policy debates while fine-tuning others. Overall, the project calls for more attention to checking and updating our common wisdom. This requires nationally representative data, and sufficient incentives among researchers and policymakers alike. Without well-grounded stylized facts, they can easily be profoundly misguided.

No MeSH data available.