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Agriculture in Africa – Telling myths from facts: A synthesis ☆

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stylized facts drive research agendas and policy debates. Yet robust stylized facts are hard to come by, and when available, often outdated. The 12 papers in this Special Issue revisit conventional wisdom on African agriculture and its farmers’ livelihoods using nationally representative surveys from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative in six African countries. At times they simply confirm our common understanding of the topic. But they also throw up a number of surprises, redirecting policy debates while fine-tuning others. Overall, the project calls for more attention to checking and updating our common wisdom. This requires nationally representative data, and sufficient incentives among researchers and policymakers alike. Without well-grounded stylized facts, they can easily be profoundly misguided.

No MeSH data available.


Virtually all purchases of modern inputs are financed from non-credit sources.
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f0025: Virtually all purchases of modern inputs are financed from non-credit sources.

Mentions: Farmers rarely use credit when purchasing farm inputs: The role of credit in rural transformation is well understood, but do African farmers make use of credit when purchasing modern inputs? Adjognon et al. (2017) show that credit use for fertilizer, pesticide or seed purchases is extremely low, across credit type (formal, informal, tied), crop (food or cash crop) and countries (Fig. 5). They estimate that on average only 6 percent of farmers use any form of credit to buy these inputs—at least in the four countries they cover (Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda). Larger farms are more likely to use credit, but interestingly, even there, the use of informal credit is found to be rare. Modern inputs are primarily financed through cash from nonfarm activities and crop sales instead.


Agriculture in Africa – Telling myths from facts: A synthesis ☆
Virtually all purchases of modern inputs are financed from non-credit sources.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384436&req=5

f0025: Virtually all purchases of modern inputs are financed from non-credit sources.
Mentions: Farmers rarely use credit when purchasing farm inputs: The role of credit in rural transformation is well understood, but do African farmers make use of credit when purchasing modern inputs? Adjognon et al. (2017) show that credit use for fertilizer, pesticide or seed purchases is extremely low, across credit type (formal, informal, tied), crop (food or cash crop) and countries (Fig. 5). They estimate that on average only 6 percent of farmers use any form of credit to buy these inputs—at least in the four countries they cover (Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda). Larger farms are more likely to use credit, but interestingly, even there, the use of informal credit is found to be rare. Modern inputs are primarily financed through cash from nonfarm activities and crop sales instead.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stylized facts drive research agendas and policy debates. Yet robust stylized facts are hard to come by, and when available, often outdated. The 12 papers in this Special Issue revisit conventional wisdom on African agriculture and its farmers’ livelihoods using nationally representative surveys from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative in six African countries. At times they simply confirm our common understanding of the topic. But they also throw up a number of surprises, redirecting policy debates while fine-tuning others. Overall, the project calls for more attention to checking and updating our common wisdom. This requires nationally representative data, and sufficient incentives among researchers and policymakers alike. Without well-grounded stylized facts, they can easily be profoundly misguided.

No MeSH data available.