Limits...
Tennis injury data from The Championships, Wimbledon, from 2003 to 2012

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: The primary aims of this retrospective study were to describe the burden of injury presenting to the medical team and the changes in injury profile over 10 years (2003–2012) at The Championships, Wimbledon. Secondary aims included description of gender difference in rates, distribution and pathology of injuries.

Design: Retrospective observational cohort of player injury presentations over 10 years (2003–2012) at The Championships, Wimbledon.

Results: The overall rate of presentation of injury for all players over the 10-year period was 20.7 per 1000 sets played. Injury rates were lower for male players (17.7 injuries per 1000 sets played) than female players (23.4 injuries per 1000 sets played). There was variability in the numbers of injuries reported by men and women players over the 10-year period.

Conclusions: The rates of presentation of injury at this Grand Slam tennis tournament varied between male and female players, and between years. More robust systems of data collection are required in professional tennis to enable more sophisticated injury data analysis between sexes, years and different playing surfaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of injuries in male and female players.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384430&req=5

BJSPORTS2015095552F7: Distribution of injuries in male and female players.

Mentions: Figures 5 and 6 display the commonest anatomical sites of injury for male and female tennis players over the 10-year period. There is variability between years and between male and female players, but the small numbers of injuries at each anatomical site over a year does not permit analysis of injury trends. Nonetheless, shoulder, knee and lumbar spine presentations are common in both male and female tennis players at The Championships. Male players appear to sustain more groin, hip, ankle and heel injuries, with wrist and foot problems being commoner in female players. Figure 7 shows a graphic representation of the proportion of injuries sustained by male and female players by body region over the 10-year period, 2003–2012. Axial injuries (including head, spine and abdomen) account for 25% and 23% injuries in male and female players, respectively, while upper limb injuries account for 28% injuries in both genders and lower limb injuries account for 47% and 49% injuries in male and female players, respectively.


Tennis injury data from The Championships, Wimbledon, from 2003 to 2012
Distribution of injuries in male and female players.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384430&req=5

BJSPORTS2015095552F7: Distribution of injuries in male and female players.
Mentions: Figures 5 and 6 display the commonest anatomical sites of injury for male and female tennis players over the 10-year period. There is variability between years and between male and female players, but the small numbers of injuries at each anatomical site over a year does not permit analysis of injury trends. Nonetheless, shoulder, knee and lumbar spine presentations are common in both male and female tennis players at The Championships. Male players appear to sustain more groin, hip, ankle and heel injuries, with wrist and foot problems being commoner in female players. Figure 7 shows a graphic representation of the proportion of injuries sustained by male and female players by body region over the 10-year period, 2003–2012. Axial injuries (including head, spine and abdomen) account for 25% and 23% injuries in male and female players, respectively, while upper limb injuries account for 28% injuries in both genders and lower limb injuries account for 47% and 49% injuries in male and female players, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: The primary aims of this retrospective study were to describe the burden of injury presenting to the medical team and the changes in injury profile over 10 years (2003–2012) at The Championships, Wimbledon. Secondary aims included description of gender difference in rates, distribution and pathology of injuries.

Design: Retrospective observational cohort of player injury presentations over 10 years (2003–2012) at The Championships, Wimbledon.

Results: The overall rate of presentation of injury for all players over the 10-year period was 20.7 per 1000 sets played. Injury rates were lower for male players (17.7 injuries per 1000 sets played) than female players (23.4 injuries per 1000 sets played). There was variability in the numbers of injuries reported by men and women players over the 10-year period.

Conclusions: The rates of presentation of injury at this Grand Slam tennis tournament varied between male and female players, and between years. More robust systems of data collection are required in professional tennis to enable more sophisticated injury data analysis between sexes, years and different playing surfaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus