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Intersecting motivations for leaving abusive relationships, substanceabuse, and transactional sex among HIV high-risk women

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Women bear a significant burden of the HIV epidemic in the UnitedStates. Women classified as ‘HIV high-risk’ often bringco-existing histories of intimate partner violence (IPV), drug use, andtransactional sex. To help inform future comprehensive HIV preventionstrategies, we aimed to explore common motivating reasons and barriers toleaving and/or terminating engagement in each of these risk-promotingsituations.

Methods: Between August and November 2014, in-depth interviews were conductedwith 14 HIV high-risk women in Atlanta, Georgia who had experienced IPV inthe previous 12 months, and used drugs and/or engaged in transactional sexin the previous five years. Participants were asked about histories of IPV,drug use, and/or engagement in transactional sex, and the motivating reasonsand barriers to terminating each.

Results: Women reported a range of motivating reasons for leaving IPV, druguse, and transactional sex. Overlapping themes included impact on children,personal physical health/safety, and life dissatisfaction. Financial needwas identified as a common barrier to leaving.

Conclusions: Future HIV prevention research should further explore the perceivedimpact of IPV, drug use, and transactional sex on physical health/safety,life dissatisfaction, one’s children, and financial need asmotivators and barriers to reducing upstream HIV risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Barriers for leaving a violent relationship, terminating drug use, andtransactional sex
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Figure 2: Barriers for leaving a violent relationship, terminating drug use, andtransactional sex

Mentions: There was little overlap in reported barriers for leaving a violentrelationship, and terminating drug use and transactional sex (Figure 2). However, financial need was a mutuallyidentified barrier to leaving IPV and transactional sex. Financial need meantwomen had to rely financially on their abusive partners and could notindependently secure the necessary resources to find alternative shelter orprovide for their children. Financial need was a barrier to terminatingengagement in transactional sex because it resulted in a loss of income.Financial need was not explicitly identified as a barrier to terminating druguse, but poverty and homelessness were both discussed as motivating reasons toinitiating and continuing drug use. Additionally, of the participants whosuccessfully completed drug rehabilitation programs, all attended the programsfree-of-charge and reported that they would not have overcome their addictionhad it not been for the rehabilitation. It is possible that other women usingdrugs may desire to enroll in a drug rehabilitation program, but are limitedfinancially; these conclusions are consistent with previous literature (CDC2013; Anderson and Saunders, 2003; Manopaiboon et al. 2003).


Intersecting motivations for leaving abusive relationships, substanceabuse, and transactional sex among HIV high-risk women
Barriers for leaving a violent relationship, terminating drug use, andtransactional sex
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384336&req=5

Figure 2: Barriers for leaving a violent relationship, terminating drug use, andtransactional sex
Mentions: There was little overlap in reported barriers for leaving a violentrelationship, and terminating drug use and transactional sex (Figure 2). However, financial need was a mutuallyidentified barrier to leaving IPV and transactional sex. Financial need meantwomen had to rely financially on their abusive partners and could notindependently secure the necessary resources to find alternative shelter orprovide for their children. Financial need was a barrier to terminatingengagement in transactional sex because it resulted in a loss of income.Financial need was not explicitly identified as a barrier to terminating druguse, but poverty and homelessness were both discussed as motivating reasons toinitiating and continuing drug use. Additionally, of the participants whosuccessfully completed drug rehabilitation programs, all attended the programsfree-of-charge and reported that they would not have overcome their addictionhad it not been for the rehabilitation. It is possible that other women usingdrugs may desire to enroll in a drug rehabilitation program, but are limitedfinancially; these conclusions are consistent with previous literature (CDC2013; Anderson and Saunders, 2003; Manopaiboon et al. 2003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Women bear a significant burden of the HIV epidemic in the UnitedStates. Women classified as ‘HIV high-risk’ often bringco-existing histories of intimate partner violence (IPV), drug use, andtransactional sex. To help inform future comprehensive HIV preventionstrategies, we aimed to explore common motivating reasons and barriers toleaving and/or terminating engagement in each of these risk-promotingsituations.

Methods: Between August and November 2014, in-depth interviews were conductedwith 14 HIV high-risk women in Atlanta, Georgia who had experienced IPV inthe previous 12 months, and used drugs and/or engaged in transactional sexin the previous five years. Participants were asked about histories of IPV,drug use, and/or engagement in transactional sex, and the motivating reasonsand barriers to terminating each.

Results: Women reported a range of motivating reasons for leaving IPV, druguse, and transactional sex. Overlapping themes included impact on children,personal physical health/safety, and life dissatisfaction. Financial needwas identified as a common barrier to leaving.

Conclusions: Future HIV prevention research should further explore the perceivedimpact of IPV, drug use, and transactional sex on physical health/safety,life dissatisfaction, one’s children, and financial need asmotivators and barriers to reducing upstream HIV risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus