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Transverse Domain Wall Profile for Spin Logic Applications

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ABSTRACT

Domain wall (DW) based logic and memory devices require precise control and manipulation of DW in nanowire conduits. The topological defects of Transverse DWs (TDW) are of paramount importance as regards to the deterministic pinning and movement of DW within complex networks of conduits. In-situ control of the DW topological defects in nanowire conduits may pave the way for novel DW logic applications. In this work, we present a geometrical modulation along a nanowire conduit, which allows for the topological rectification/inversion of TDW in nanowires. This is achieved by exploiting the controlled relaxation of the TDW within an angled rectangle. Direct evidence of the logical operation is obtained via magnetic force microscopy measurement.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Scanning Electron Microscopy image of the geometrical modulation, rectifier, patterned along the nanowire conduit; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of the topological rectifier with the rectifier; (b) At remanence, after saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively and, After applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. (c) At remanence, after saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively, and after applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast.
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f4: (a) Scanning Electron Microscopy image of the geometrical modulation, rectifier, patterned along the nanowire conduit; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of the topological rectifier with the rectifier; (b) At remanence, after saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively and, After applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. (c) At remanence, after saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively, and after applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast.

Mentions: To test the rectifier structure, the angled rectangle is patterned along the nanowire conduit, as seen in Fig. 4(a). The rectifier has a width of ~240 nm (~2 × w) and length ~480 nm (~4 × w), angled with respect to the horizontal axis, at ∼+11°, for rectifier (Fig. 4(a)). In Figure 4(b), we present the initial configuration of the rectifier. The selector is set in the +y direction, characterized by bright and dark contrasts, and the spins along the conduit are aligned in the +x direction. The rectifier is distinguished by a white and dark contrast at the left and right hand edges, due to the accumulation of magnetic charges at the edge. Increase in the magnetic field along the −x direction results in the injection of a TTU DW (−½ ∼ +½ winding numbers) into the conduit. The resulting MFM image after application of a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction is shown in Fig. 4(b). This results in the lower branch of the detector switching direction, as evident from the MFM image of Fig. 4(b). This implies that the output from the rectifier has −½ ∼ +½ winding numbers. We infer that the TTU DW does not undergo any topological rectification as it moves through the rectifier.


Transverse Domain Wall Profile for Spin Logic Applications
(a) Scanning Electron Microscopy image of the geometrical modulation, rectifier, patterned along the nanowire conduit; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of the topological rectifier with the rectifier; (b) At remanence, after saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively and, After applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. (c) At remanence, after saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively, and after applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384327&req=5

f4: (a) Scanning Electron Microscopy image of the geometrical modulation, rectifier, patterned along the nanowire conduit; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of the topological rectifier with the rectifier; (b) At remanence, after saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively and, After applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. (c) At remanence, after saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively, and after applying a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction. The lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast.
Mentions: To test the rectifier structure, the angled rectangle is patterned along the nanowire conduit, as seen in Fig. 4(a). The rectifier has a width of ~240 nm (~2 × w) and length ~480 nm (~4 × w), angled with respect to the horizontal axis, at ∼+11°, for rectifier (Fig. 4(a)). In Figure 4(b), we present the initial configuration of the rectifier. The selector is set in the +y direction, characterized by bright and dark contrasts, and the spins along the conduit are aligned in the +x direction. The rectifier is distinguished by a white and dark contrast at the left and right hand edges, due to the accumulation of magnetic charges at the edge. Increase in the magnetic field along the −x direction results in the injection of a TTU DW (−½ ∼ +½ winding numbers) into the conduit. The resulting MFM image after application of a field of 150 Oe along the −x direction is shown in Fig. 4(b). This results in the lower branch of the detector switching direction, as evident from the MFM image of Fig. 4(b). This implies that the output from the rectifier has −½ ∼ +½ winding numbers. We infer that the TTU DW does not undergo any topological rectification as it moves through the rectifier.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Domain wall (DW) based logic and memory devices require precise control and manipulation of DW in nanowire conduits. The topological defects of Transverse DWs (TDW) are of paramount importance as regards to the deterministic pinning and movement of DW within complex networks of conduits. In-situ control of the DW topological defects in nanowire conduits may pave the way for novel DW logic applications. In this work, we present a geometrical modulation along a nanowire conduit, which allows for the topological rectification/inversion of TDW in nanowires. This is achieved by exploiting the controlled relaxation of the TDW within an angled rectangle. Direct evidence of the logical operation is obtained via magnetic force microscopy measurement.

No MeSH data available.