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Transverse Domain Wall Profile for Spin Logic Applications

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Domain wall (DW) based logic and memory devices require precise control and manipulation of DW in nanowire conduits. The topological defects of Transverse DWs (TDW) are of paramount importance as regards to the deterministic pinning and movement of DW within complex networks of conduits. In-situ control of the DW topological defects in nanowire conduits may pave the way for novel DW logic applications. In this work, we present a geometrical modulation along a nanowire conduit, which allows for the topological rectification/inversion of TDW in nanowires. This is achieved by exploiting the controlled relaxation of the TDW within an angled rectangle. Direct evidence of the logical operation is obtained via magnetic force microscopy measurement.

No MeSH data available.


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Scanning Electron Microscopy image of thin film, Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm): (a) Domain wall detector, with a transverse nanowire acting like a chirality selector and a nucleation pad; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of initial and final configuration (after applying a field of 100 Oe along the −x direction) of the topological detector, (b) with initial configuration following saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTU TDW with winding numbers of −½ ∼ +½ flowing in the conduit, (c) with initial saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that upper branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTD TDW with winding numbers of +½ ∼ −½ flowing in the conduit.
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f3: Scanning Electron Microscopy image of thin film, Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm): (a) Domain wall detector, with a transverse nanowire acting like a chirality selector and a nucleation pad; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of initial and final configuration (after applying a field of 100 Oe along the −x direction) of the topological detector, (b) with initial configuration following saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTU TDW with winding numbers of −½ ∼ +½ flowing in the conduit, (c) with initial saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that upper branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTD TDW with winding numbers of +½ ∼ −½ flowing in the conduit.

Mentions: We have experimentally verified this principle using the same nanowire conduit dimensions as the rectifier structure. The topological detector is shown in the scanning electron microscope image, Fig. 3(a). A nucleation pad with a transverse nanowire, acting as a selector is used, so as to ensure proper control on the type of TDW being injected in the conduit. The selector sets the transverse component of the DW exiting the nucleation pad. The Y-shape detector comprises of two wires angled at ∼±70° from the horizontal. The device comprises of Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm) thin film grown using magnetron sputtering, with the bottom and top Ta layers being a buffer and capping layers, respectively. The nanowire conduit has a width, w, of 120 nm, to ensure that the TDW is the stable configuration. The DW detector and selector, both have a wire width of 120 nm. The nanowire conduit length from the selector to the detector is kept to 200 nm.


Transverse Domain Wall Profile for Spin Logic Applications
Scanning Electron Microscopy image of thin film, Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm): (a) Domain wall detector, with a transverse nanowire acting like a chirality selector and a nucleation pad; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of initial and final configuration (after applying a field of 100 Oe along the −x direction) of the topological detector, (b) with initial configuration following saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTU TDW with winding numbers of −½ ∼ +½ flowing in the conduit, (c) with initial saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that upper branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTD TDW with winding numbers of +½ ∼ −½ flowing in the conduit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384327&req=5

f3: Scanning Electron Microscopy image of thin film, Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm): (a) Domain wall detector, with a transverse nanowire acting like a chirality selector and a nucleation pad; Magnetic Force Microscopy images of initial and final configuration (after applying a field of 100 Oe along the −x direction) of the topological detector, (b) with initial configuration following saturation along the +y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that lower branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTU TDW with winding numbers of −½ ∼ +½ flowing in the conduit, (c) with initial saturation along the −y and +x direction respectively. The final configuration shows that upper branch of the detector switches as evidenced by the bright contrast. This is due to the formation of a TTD TDW with winding numbers of +½ ∼ −½ flowing in the conduit.
Mentions: We have experimentally verified this principle using the same nanowire conduit dimensions as the rectifier structure. The topological detector is shown in the scanning electron microscope image, Fig. 3(a). A nucleation pad with a transverse nanowire, acting as a selector is used, so as to ensure proper control on the type of TDW being injected in the conduit. The selector sets the transverse component of the DW exiting the nucleation pad. The Y-shape detector comprises of two wires angled at ∼±70° from the horizontal. The device comprises of Ta(5 nm)/Ni80Fe20(10 nm)/Ta(5 nm) thin film grown using magnetron sputtering, with the bottom and top Ta layers being a buffer and capping layers, respectively. The nanowire conduit has a width, w, of 120 nm, to ensure that the TDW is the stable configuration. The DW detector and selector, both have a wire width of 120 nm. The nanowire conduit length from the selector to the detector is kept to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Domain wall (DW) based logic and memory devices require precise control and manipulation of DW in nanowire conduits. The topological defects of Transverse DWs (TDW) are of paramount importance as regards to the deterministic pinning and movement of DW within complex networks of conduits. In-situ control of the DW topological defects in nanowire conduits may pave the way for novel DW logic applications. In this work, we present a geometrical modulation along a nanowire conduit, which allows for the topological rectification/inversion of TDW in nanowires. This is achieved by exploiting the controlled relaxation of the TDW within an angled rectangle. Direct evidence of the logical operation is obtained via magnetic force microscopy measurement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus