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Pufferfish nests vs. parasite hooks: A bizarre resemblance

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Pufferfishes construct nests on the sandy bottom of the seabed.

Armed tapeworm parasites have on their head or scolex rows of hooks.

We pay attention to the bizarre resemblance between these two structures.

We pay attention to the bizarre resemblance between these two structures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Two different views of a pupperfish nest is shown in a and c. A row of hooks of a Hymenolepis genus tapeworm can be observed in b, and one of Taenia in d.a,c: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWtmSoimhcM.
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fig1: Two different views of a pupperfish nest is shown in a and c. A row of hooks of a Hymenolepis genus tapeworm can be observed in b, and one of Taenia in d.a,c: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWtmSoimhcM.

Mentions: On the head or scolex, those known as 'armed' tapeworms, have on the rostellum (protuberant apical portion of the scolex), one or more rows of hooks that aid to their attachment to the host's intestine. Fig. 1 shows this curious and anecdotal resemblance between one of these nearly 2 m wide circular structures made by the pufferfish (Fig. 1a,c), and the much smaller (less than 1 mm) rows of hooks of two tapeworms belonging to the Hymenolepis (Fig. 1b), and Taenia (Fig. 1d) genus. In the nests, the peaks and valleys present a shape and number highly similar to the tapeworm hooks. The design of these radially aligned peaks and valleys allows an effective control of the water flow to gather fine sand particles to improve the nest (Kawase et al., 2013). Similarly, the circular arrangement of the hooks on the scolex of the tapeworms could not only improve the attachment of the worm to the host, but also facilitates the gathering of intestinal fluid containing oxygen as well as nutrients for the parasites.


Pufferfish nests vs. parasite hooks: A bizarre resemblance
Two different views of a pupperfish nest is shown in a and c. A row of hooks of a Hymenolepis genus tapeworm can be observed in b, and one of Taenia in d.a,c: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWtmSoimhcM.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384288&req=5

fig1: Two different views of a pupperfish nest is shown in a and c. A row of hooks of a Hymenolepis genus tapeworm can be observed in b, and one of Taenia in d.a,c: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWtmSoimhcM.
Mentions: On the head or scolex, those known as 'armed' tapeworms, have on the rostellum (protuberant apical portion of the scolex), one or more rows of hooks that aid to their attachment to the host's intestine. Fig. 1 shows this curious and anecdotal resemblance between one of these nearly 2 m wide circular structures made by the pufferfish (Fig. 1a,c), and the much smaller (less than 1 mm) rows of hooks of two tapeworms belonging to the Hymenolepis (Fig. 1b), and Taenia (Fig. 1d) genus. In the nests, the peaks and valleys present a shape and number highly similar to the tapeworm hooks. The design of these radially aligned peaks and valleys allows an effective control of the water flow to gather fine sand particles to improve the nest (Kawase et al., 2013). Similarly, the circular arrangement of the hooks on the scolex of the tapeworms could not only improve the attachment of the worm to the host, but also facilitates the gathering of intestinal fluid containing oxygen as well as nutrients for the parasites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Pufferfishes construct nests on the sandy bottom of the seabed.

Armed tapeworm parasites have on their head or scolex rows of hooks.

We pay attention to the bizarre resemblance between these two structures.

We pay attention to the bizarre resemblance between these two structures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus