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Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties

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ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson’s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Front and side views of the closed-loop element, as well as geometrical characteristics of the first-order element. The structural organization of the first-order element (as well as the closed-loop element) can be defined by two constant values related to the topology of the underlying Miura-ori unit, length a and angle α, and one variable angle which can be chosen between β, θ, and ξ representing the structure’s single degree of freedom. (b) Variations of cross-sectional area and volume of the closed-loop element (respectively normalized by a2 and a3) with respect to the folding ratio. (c) Plots of Poisson’s ratio versus folding ratio for in-plane diagonal directions, D1 and D2, while the insets in (b,c) show the folded configurations for α = 75°, 60°. 45°, 30° at the specified points. (d) Rigid-foldability of the closed-loop element under out-of-plane and in-plane loadings (i.e., two orthogonal directions).
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f4: (a) Front and side views of the closed-loop element, as well as geometrical characteristics of the first-order element. The structural organization of the first-order element (as well as the closed-loop element) can be defined by two constant values related to the topology of the underlying Miura-ori unit, length a and angle α, and one variable angle which can be chosen between β, θ, and ξ representing the structure’s single degree of freedom. (b) Variations of cross-sectional area and volume of the closed-loop element (respectively normalized by a2 and a3) with respect to the folding ratio. (c) Plots of Poisson’s ratio versus folding ratio for in-plane diagonal directions, D1 and D2, while the insets in (b,c) show the folded configurations for α = 75°, 60°. 45°, 30° at the specified points. (d) Rigid-foldability of the closed-loop element under out-of-plane and in-plane loadings (i.e., two orthogonal directions).

Mentions: The behavior and properties of the cellular metamaterial, which exhibits periodicity in both in-plane as well as out-of-plane directions can be analytically evaluated by assuming an infinite repetition of a representative volume element (i.e., RVE; same as the closed-loop element) of the cellular metamaterial, Fig. 4(a) – left and middle images. Thus, we investigate the kinematics and kinetics of the cellular metamaterial by analyzing the closed-loop element during folding. Figure 4(a) shows top and side views of the closed-loop element as well as the geometrical characteristics of the constituting first-order element introduced earlier. The in-plane diagonals, D1 and D2, and out-of-plane height, H, of the closed-loop element at an arbitrary level of folding, illustrated in Fig. 4(a), are given in terms of the geometry of the underlying Miura-ori unit as (see Supporting Information for details):


Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties
(a) Front and side views of the closed-loop element, as well as geometrical characteristics of the first-order element. The structural organization of the first-order element (as well as the closed-loop element) can be defined by two constant values related to the topology of the underlying Miura-ori unit, length a and angle α, and one variable angle which can be chosen between β, θ, and ξ representing the structure’s single degree of freedom. (b) Variations of cross-sectional area and volume of the closed-loop element (respectively normalized by a2 and a3) with respect to the folding ratio. (c) Plots of Poisson’s ratio versus folding ratio for in-plane diagonal directions, D1 and D2, while the insets in (b,c) show the folded configurations for α = 75°, 60°. 45°, 30° at the specified points. (d) Rigid-foldability of the closed-loop element under out-of-plane and in-plane loadings (i.e., two orthogonal directions).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f4: (a) Front and side views of the closed-loop element, as well as geometrical characteristics of the first-order element. The structural organization of the first-order element (as well as the closed-loop element) can be defined by two constant values related to the topology of the underlying Miura-ori unit, length a and angle α, and one variable angle which can be chosen between β, θ, and ξ representing the structure’s single degree of freedom. (b) Variations of cross-sectional area and volume of the closed-loop element (respectively normalized by a2 and a3) with respect to the folding ratio. (c) Plots of Poisson’s ratio versus folding ratio for in-plane diagonal directions, D1 and D2, while the insets in (b,c) show the folded configurations for α = 75°, 60°. 45°, 30° at the specified points. (d) Rigid-foldability of the closed-loop element under out-of-plane and in-plane loadings (i.e., two orthogonal directions).
Mentions: The behavior and properties of the cellular metamaterial, which exhibits periodicity in both in-plane as well as out-of-plane directions can be analytically evaluated by assuming an infinite repetition of a representative volume element (i.e., RVE; same as the closed-loop element) of the cellular metamaterial, Fig. 4(a) – left and middle images. Thus, we investigate the kinematics and kinetics of the cellular metamaterial by analyzing the closed-loop element during folding. Figure 4(a) shows top and side views of the closed-loop element as well as the geometrical characteristics of the constituting first-order element introduced earlier. The in-plane diagonals, D1 and D2, and out-of-plane height, H, of the closed-loop element at an arbitrary level of folding, illustrated in Fig. 4(a), are given in terms of the geometry of the underlying Miura-ori unit as (see Supporting Information for details):

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson’s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.