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Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson’s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Assembly and locking procedure for two first-order elements. (b) The assembly and self-locking feature of the first-order elements are transferred to the building blocks. This forms the final assembly of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial. (c) Measuring the resisting force for unlocked and locked states of two building blocks of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial, where the unlocked configuration exhibits no resisting force while in the locked state the structure shows noticeable resisting force before locking fails.
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f3: (a) Assembly and locking procedure for two first-order elements. (b) The assembly and self-locking feature of the first-order elements are transferred to the building blocks. This forms the final assembly of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial. (c) Measuring the resisting force for unlocked and locked states of two building blocks of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial, where the unlocked configuration exhibits no resisting force while in the locked state the structure shows noticeable resisting force before locking fails.

Mentions: It is essential to employ a connecting mechanism to link the adjacent unit cells of a lattice structure together, to form the final configuration of the system. An example of this mechanism is using an adhesive material to connect the unit cells together, however, this may affect the foldability of the structure by restricting degrees of freedom of the system, which will definitely alter the geometrical and mechanical properties of the final assembly. Here, we introduce an embedded self-locking mechanism into the proposed foldable unit, bonding the adjacent units together, which originates from the locking of first-order elements as shown in Fig. 3(a). To ensure fitting of one first-order element into another, each element must have a folding level corresponding to β > 90°. Once a contact is established between the two elements, self-locking can manifest by decreasing the folding angle to β < 90°, as for example is achieved in Fig. 3(a) – right image, by applying an out-of-plane compression.


Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties
(a) Assembly and locking procedure for two first-order elements. (b) The assembly and self-locking feature of the first-order elements are transferred to the building blocks. This forms the final assembly of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial. (c) Measuring the resisting force for unlocked and locked states of two building blocks of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial, where the unlocked configuration exhibits no resisting force while in the locked state the structure shows noticeable resisting force before locking fails.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384242&req=5

f3: (a) Assembly and locking procedure for two first-order elements. (b) The assembly and self-locking feature of the first-order elements are transferred to the building blocks. This forms the final assembly of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial. (c) Measuring the resisting force for unlocked and locked states of two building blocks of the Origami-based cellular metamaterial, where the unlocked configuration exhibits no resisting force while in the locked state the structure shows noticeable resisting force before locking fails.
Mentions: It is essential to employ a connecting mechanism to link the adjacent unit cells of a lattice structure together, to form the final configuration of the system. An example of this mechanism is using an adhesive material to connect the unit cells together, however, this may affect the foldability of the structure by restricting degrees of freedom of the system, which will definitely alter the geometrical and mechanical properties of the final assembly. Here, we introduce an embedded self-locking mechanism into the proposed foldable unit, bonding the adjacent units together, which originates from the locking of first-order elements as shown in Fig. 3(a). To ensure fitting of one first-order element into another, each element must have a folding level corresponding to β > 90°. Once a contact is established between the two elements, self-locking can manifest by decreasing the folding angle to β < 90°, as for example is achieved in Fig. 3(a) – right image, by applying an out-of-plane compression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson&rsquo;s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.