Limits...
Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson’s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.


All possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384242&req=5

f2: All possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements.

Mentions: To achieve a foldable configuration, the left hand side of Equation (2) must be independent of the folding variable, β (note that the right hand side of the equation is a constant and independent of β). This yields m1 + m2 = 2 and m3 = 2, meaning that the only possible foldable configuration is a ‘quadrangle’ (n = 4). The examples provided in Fig. 1(c) are the only configurations that satisfy the Equation (2). The left and middle configurations can only built for β = 90°, while the right configuration can be built for any value of . This means that the left and middle configurations are rigid and the only possible foldable polygon is the jigsaw-puzzle-like unit cell highlighted in green (see Supporting Information for further discussions on the rigidity of unit cells). All other possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (i.e., the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements introduced in Fig. 1(b), are given in Fig. 2. Note that all these elements are rigid (i.e., non-foldable), since they don’t satisfy Equation (2), however, they can be used as building blocks to construct rigid tessellations such as the well-known ‘Kagome’ structure made from triangular and hexagonal elements (see Supplementary Fig. S2 for an illustration of the structure).


Origami-based cellular metamaterial with auxetic, bistable, and self-locking properties
All possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384242&req=5

f2: All possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements.
Mentions: To achieve a foldable configuration, the left hand side of Equation (2) must be independent of the folding variable, β (note that the right hand side of the equation is a constant and independent of β). This yields m1 + m2 = 2 and m3 = 2, meaning that the only possible foldable configuration is a ‘quadrangle’ (n = 4). The examples provided in Fig. 1(c) are the only configurations that satisfy the Equation (2). The left and middle configurations can only built for β = 90°, while the right configuration can be built for any value of . This means that the left and middle configurations are rigid and the only possible foldable polygon is the jigsaw-puzzle-like unit cell highlighted in green (see Supporting Information for further discussions on the rigidity of unit cells). All other possible configurations of triangular, quadrilateral, and hexagonal closed-loop elements (i.e., the only 2D shapes which can individually tessellate the 2D space to form periodic geometries), formed by different types of second-order elements introduced in Fig. 1(b), are given in Fig. 2. Note that all these elements are rigid (i.e., non-foldable), since they don’t satisfy Equation (2), however, they can be used as building blocks to construct rigid tessellations such as the well-known ‘Kagome’ structure made from triangular and hexagonal elements (see Supplementary Fig. S2 for an illustration of the structure).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We present a novel cellular metamaterial constructed from Origami building blocks based on Miura-ori fold. The proposed cellular metamaterial exhibits unusual properties some of which stemming from the inherent properties of its Origami building blocks, and others manifesting due to its unique geometrical construction and architecture. These properties include foldability with two fully-folded configurations, auxeticity (i.e., negative Poisson’s ratio), bistability, and self-locking of Origami building blocks to construct load-bearing cellular metamaterials. The kinematics and force response of the cellular metamaterial during folding were studied to investigate the underlying mechanisms resulting in its unique properties using analytical modeling and experiments.

No MeSH data available.