Limits...
Pathogenic traits of Salmonella Montevideo in experimental infections in vivo and in vitro

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Salmonella serovar Montevideo (SM) is frequently associated with human Salmonella infections and causes gastrointestinal disease, cases are common particularly among individuals who come in close contact with live poultry or poultry meat products. To characterize SM disease in chickens, the pathogenic traits and tissue predilections of the disease were investigated. Dissemination of fluorescent-tagged SM (JOL1575GFP) was monitored after oral and intramuscular mock infections of specific-pathogen-free chickens. The spleen was predominantly affected by intramuscular infection while the cecum, spleen, and minimally liver were affected by oral infection. No conspicuous illness was observed in infected birds, and histopathological examination showed minimal damage of the intestinal epithelium and splenic parenchyma though SM was readily isolated from these tissues. Levels of SM internalization by primary chicken peritoneal macrophages were similar to that of Salmonella Typhimurium. SM was more sensitive to chicken than rabbit serum complement killing. Internal egg contamination of SM mock infected layers also occurred at trace levels and lasted for a week after inoculation. This study also confirmed that SM infection in chickens is sub-clinical and asymptomatic, which suggests that latent asymptomatic carriers may excrete a large number of bacteria and transmit the pathogen by contaminating water or food sources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In vivo tracking of SM-GFP infection in chicken organs.SM dissemination was tracked with a GFP-tagged SM strain at 48 hr after mock infection. Immunologically mature SPF chickens were inoculated with JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV which is having a peak excitation at 395 nm and a peak emission at 509 nm. Uninoculated chickens were used as a control to differentiate autofluorescent tissues. Thin tissue biopsy sections were collected from representative organs and observed under a fluorescent microscope. Infection foci were observed in the liver, small intestines, spleen, and cecum of infected birds. The organs of control uninoculated birds had no SM-GFP fluorescence signal. Black arrow heads indicate fluorescent signals emitted by SM-GFP in infected tissues.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384224&req=5

f3: In vivo tracking of SM-GFP infection in chicken organs.SM dissemination was tracked with a GFP-tagged SM strain at 48 hr after mock infection. Immunologically mature SPF chickens were inoculated with JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV which is having a peak excitation at 395 nm and a peak emission at 509 nm. Uninoculated chickens were used as a control to differentiate autofluorescent tissues. Thin tissue biopsy sections were collected from representative organs and observed under a fluorescent microscope. Infection foci were observed in the liver, small intestines, spleen, and cecum of infected birds. The organs of control uninoculated birds had no SM-GFP fluorescence signal. Black arrow heads indicate fluorescent signals emitted by SM-GFP in infected tissues.

Mentions: Visceral chicken organs affected by inoculation with wild type SM were monitored and tracked with strain JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV (Supplementary Fig. 1). At 48 hr after inoculation, the spleen and cecum were the main sites of SM bacterial localization. Fluorescent signals from the SM-GFP strains were also detected in the liver, although at a lower intensity than in the spleen or intestinal epithelial tissues. The duodenum and jejunum also revealed infection (Fig. 3). GFP signals were not observed in the crop, lungs, or proventriculus. Reproductive tissues did not show any signs of SM localization or infection. Oviduct and ovarian tissues did not show a JOL1575GFP signal upon fluorescence microscopic examination. Ex vivo whole-organ fluorescence images were also acquired, with representative spleens showing fluorescence (Supplementary Fig. 2). No SM-GFP-associated fluorescence signals were observed in organs of control uninoculated birds.


Pathogenic traits of Salmonella Montevideo in experimental infections in vivo and in vitro
In vivo tracking of SM-GFP infection in chicken organs.SM dissemination was tracked with a GFP-tagged SM strain at 48 hr after mock infection. Immunologically mature SPF chickens were inoculated with JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV which is having a peak excitation at 395 nm and a peak emission at 509 nm. Uninoculated chickens were used as a control to differentiate autofluorescent tissues. Thin tissue biopsy sections were collected from representative organs and observed under a fluorescent microscope. Infection foci were observed in the liver, small intestines, spleen, and cecum of infected birds. The organs of control uninoculated birds had no SM-GFP fluorescence signal. Black arrow heads indicate fluorescent signals emitted by SM-GFP in infected tissues.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384224&req=5

f3: In vivo tracking of SM-GFP infection in chicken organs.SM dissemination was tracked with a GFP-tagged SM strain at 48 hr after mock infection. Immunologically mature SPF chickens were inoculated with JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV which is having a peak excitation at 395 nm and a peak emission at 509 nm. Uninoculated chickens were used as a control to differentiate autofluorescent tissues. Thin tissue biopsy sections were collected from representative organs and observed under a fluorescent microscope. Infection foci were observed in the liver, small intestines, spleen, and cecum of infected birds. The organs of control uninoculated birds had no SM-GFP fluorescence signal. Black arrow heads indicate fluorescent signals emitted by SM-GFP in infected tissues.
Mentions: Visceral chicken organs affected by inoculation with wild type SM were monitored and tracked with strain JOL1575GFP expressing GFPuV (Supplementary Fig. 1). At 48 hr after inoculation, the spleen and cecum were the main sites of SM bacterial localization. Fluorescent signals from the SM-GFP strains were also detected in the liver, although at a lower intensity than in the spleen or intestinal epithelial tissues. The duodenum and jejunum also revealed infection (Fig. 3). GFP signals were not observed in the crop, lungs, or proventriculus. Reproductive tissues did not show any signs of SM localization or infection. Oviduct and ovarian tissues did not show a JOL1575GFP signal upon fluorescence microscopic examination. Ex vivo whole-organ fluorescence images were also acquired, with representative spleens showing fluorescence (Supplementary Fig. 2). No SM-GFP-associated fluorescence signals were observed in organs of control uninoculated birds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Salmonella serovar Montevideo (SM) is frequently associated with human Salmonella infections and causes gastrointestinal disease, cases are common particularly among individuals who come in close contact with live poultry or poultry meat products. To characterize SM disease in chickens, the pathogenic traits and tissue predilections of the disease were investigated. Dissemination of fluorescent-tagged SM (JOL1575GFP) was monitored after oral and intramuscular mock infections of specific-pathogen-free chickens. The spleen was predominantly affected by intramuscular infection while the cecum, spleen, and minimally liver were affected by oral infection. No conspicuous illness was observed in infected birds, and histopathological examination showed minimal damage of the intestinal epithelium and splenic parenchyma though SM was readily isolated from these tissues. Levels of SM internalization by primary chicken peritoneal macrophages were similar to that of Salmonella Typhimurium. SM was more sensitive to chicken than rabbit serum complement killing. Internal egg contamination of SM mock infected layers also occurred at trace levels and lasted for a week after inoculation. This study also confirmed that SM infection in chickens is sub-clinical and asymptomatic, which suggests that latent asymptomatic carriers may excrete a large number of bacteria and transmit the pathogen by contaminating water or food sources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus