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Transgenerational transmission of a stress-coping phenotype programmed by early-life stress in the Japanese quail

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An interesting aspect of developmental programming is the existence of transgenerational effects that influence offspring characteristics and performance later in life. These transgenerational effects have been hypothesized to allow individuals to cope better with predictable environmental fluctuations and thus facilitate adaptation to changing environments. Here, we test for the first time how early-life stress drives developmental programming and transgenerational effects of maternal exposure to early-life stress on several phenotypic traits in their offspring in a functionally relevant context using a fully factorial design. We manipulated pre- and/or post-natal stress in both Japanese quail mothers and offspring and examined the consequences for several stress-related traits in the offspring generation. We show that pre-natal stress experienced by the mother did not simply affect offspring phenotype but resulted in the inheritance of the same stress-coping traits in the offspring across all phenotypic levels that we investigated, shaping neuroendocrine, physiological and behavioural traits. This may serve mothers to better prepare their offspring to cope with later environments where the same stressors are experienced.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maternal exposure and offspring exposure to pre-natal stress increased offspring glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the hypothalamus.Relative expression of (a) glucocorticoid receptor mRNA (GR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar) (b) mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA (MR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar). Values are means ± SEM. *Indicates significant differences.
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f6: Maternal exposure and offspring exposure to pre-natal stress increased offspring glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the hypothalamus.Relative expression of (a) glucocorticoid receptor mRNA (GR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar) (b) mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA (MR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar). Values are means ± SEM. *Indicates significant differences.

Mentions: In the offspring hypothalamus, both GR and MR relative expression was only significantly influenced by maternal pre-natal treatment and offspring pre-natal treatment whereas the GR:MR mRNA ratio was not affected by any of the independent variables (Table 1). For both receptors, pre-natal stress (MatPreCort and OffPreFood-) was associated with an increased mRNA expression (Fig. 6a,b).


Transgenerational transmission of a stress-coping phenotype programmed by early-life stress in the Japanese quail
Maternal exposure and offspring exposure to pre-natal stress increased offspring glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the hypothalamus.Relative expression of (a) glucocorticoid receptor mRNA (GR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar) (b) mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA (MR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar). Values are means ± SEM. *Indicates significant differences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384203&req=5

f6: Maternal exposure and offspring exposure to pre-natal stress increased offspring glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the hypothalamus.Relative expression of (a) glucocorticoid receptor mRNA (GR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar) (b) mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA (MR) in the hypothalamus of offspring of pre-natal control mothers (MatPreCtrl, white bar) and of pre-natally stressed mothers (MatPreCort, black bar) and in pre-natal control offspring (OffPreCtrl, empty grey bar) and in pre-natally stressed offspring (OffPreCort, left hatched grey bar). Values are means ± SEM. *Indicates significant differences.
Mentions: In the offspring hypothalamus, both GR and MR relative expression was only significantly influenced by maternal pre-natal treatment and offspring pre-natal treatment whereas the GR:MR mRNA ratio was not affected by any of the independent variables (Table 1). For both receptors, pre-natal stress (MatPreCort and OffPreFood-) was associated with an increased mRNA expression (Fig. 6a,b).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An interesting aspect of developmental programming is the existence of transgenerational effects that influence offspring characteristics and performance later in life. These transgenerational effects have been hypothesized to allow individuals to cope better with predictable environmental fluctuations and thus facilitate adaptation to changing environments. Here, we test for the first time how early-life stress drives developmental programming and transgenerational effects of maternal exposure to early-life stress on several phenotypic traits in their offspring in a functionally relevant context using a fully factorial design. We manipulated pre- and/or post-natal stress in both Japanese quail mothers and offspring and examined the consequences for several stress-related traits in the offspring generation. We show that pre-natal stress experienced by the mother did not simply affect offspring phenotype but resulted in the inheritance of the same stress-coping traits in the offspring across all phenotypic levels that we investigated, shaping neuroendocrine, physiological and behavioural traits. This may serve mothers to better prepare their offspring to cope with later environments where the same stressors are experienced.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus