Limits...
Think Yellow and Keep Green — Role of Sulfanes from Garlic in Agriculture

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Reactive sulfur species from garlic have long been renowned for their health benefits and antimicrobial properties. In agriculture the subject matter is now gathering momentum in the search for new bio-pesticides to addressing emerging environmental concerns and tighter restrictions on the use of many conventional chemical pesticides. Although the precise modes of action of these garlic-derived bioactives is complex, recent research has provided a number of new insights that deepen our understanding of garlic-derived products, such as garlic extracts and oils. Herein, their activity against various crop-damaging pests is reviewed. In many cases, there seems to be a broad range of activity associated with the sulfur-containing compounds derived from Allium species, which manifests itself in diverse insecticidal, antifungal, and nematicidal activities. These activities open a new understanding to develop this natural chemistry as a “green pesticide”.

No MeSH data available.


Using DAS3 as an example, possible intracellular reaction pathways of DAPS and their physiological consequences. All reactions described above are possible for DAS3–DAS6, whereas DAS2 is limited to thiol/disulfide reactions with glutathione and protein thiols to form mixed disulfides.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384167&req=5

antioxidants-06-00003-f002: Using DAS3 as an example, possible intracellular reaction pathways of DAPS and their physiological consequences. All reactions described above are possible for DAS3–DAS6, whereas DAS2 is limited to thiol/disulfide reactions with glutathione and protein thiols to form mixed disulfides.

Mentions: Despite their molecular simplicity, DAPS are able to exert their biological effects via an extensive range of reaction pathways (Figure 2). Once inside cells, DAPS can rapidly react (via thiol polysulfide exchange) with low molecular weight thiols (e.g., glutathione) and protein thiols to disrupt the cellular redox balance and enzyme function, respectively. Such reactions also liberate reactive perthiols, which can subsequently generate superoxide and perthiol radicals [6] that can cause oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, and proteins.


Think Yellow and Keep Green — Role of Sulfanes from Garlic in Agriculture
Using DAS3 as an example, possible intracellular reaction pathways of DAPS and their physiological consequences. All reactions described above are possible for DAS3–DAS6, whereas DAS2 is limited to thiol/disulfide reactions with glutathione and protein thiols to form mixed disulfides.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384167&req=5

antioxidants-06-00003-f002: Using DAS3 as an example, possible intracellular reaction pathways of DAPS and their physiological consequences. All reactions described above are possible for DAS3–DAS6, whereas DAS2 is limited to thiol/disulfide reactions with glutathione and protein thiols to form mixed disulfides.
Mentions: Despite their molecular simplicity, DAPS are able to exert their biological effects via an extensive range of reaction pathways (Figure 2). Once inside cells, DAPS can rapidly react (via thiol polysulfide exchange) with low molecular weight thiols (e.g., glutathione) and protein thiols to disrupt the cellular redox balance and enzyme function, respectively. Such reactions also liberate reactive perthiols, which can subsequently generate superoxide and perthiol radicals [6] that can cause oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, and proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Reactive sulfur species from garlic have long been renowned for their health benefits and antimicrobial properties. In agriculture the subject matter is now gathering momentum in the search for new bio-pesticides to addressing emerging environmental concerns and tighter restrictions on the use of many conventional chemical pesticides. Although the precise modes of action of these garlic-derived bioactives is complex, recent research has provided a number of new insights that deepen our understanding of garlic-derived products, such as garlic extracts and oils. Herein, their activity against various crop-damaging pests is reviewed. In many cases, there seems to be a broad range of activity associated with the sulfur-containing compounds derived from Allium species, which manifests itself in diverse insecticidal, antifungal, and nematicidal activities. These activities open a new understanding to develop this natural chemistry as a “green pesticide”.

No MeSH data available.