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Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris

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ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods including nuts, fruits, vegetables, chocolate, wine, and tea. Polyphenols have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Recent studies suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for reducing sebum production in the skin and for treatment of acne vulgaris. This review examines the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested tea polyphenols against sebum production and for acne treatment and prevention. The PubMed database was searched for studies on tea polyphenols, sebum secretion, and acne vulgaris. Of the 59 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. Two studies evaluated tea polyphenol effects on sebum production; six studies examined tea polyphenol effects on acne vulgaris. Seven studies evaluated topical tea polyphenols; one study examined systemic tea polyphenols. None of the studies evaluated both topical and systemic tea polyphenols. Tea polyphenol sources included green tea (six studies) and tea, type not specified (two studies). Overall, there is some evidence that tea polyphenols in topical formulation may be beneficial in reducing sebum secretion and in treatment of acne. Research studies of high quality and with large sample sizes are needed to assess the efficacy of tea polyphenols in topical and oral prevention of acne vulgaris and lipid synthesis by the sebaceous glands.

No MeSH data available.


Major components of the tea polyphenol family.
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antioxidants-06-00002-f001: Major components of the tea polyphenol family.

Mentions: Tea is the second most consumed beverage worldwide and an important source of plant polyphenols in the human diet [12]. Camellia sinensis is the plant that gives rise to a variety of teas depending on specific processing of the plant [13]. Green tea is produced from fresh leaves in such a way that prevents oxidation of polyphenolic components (mainly catechins), oolong tea polyphenols are partially oxidized, while polyphenols in black tea undergo a high degree of oxidation [13]. Components of green tea beverage measured as weight percentage of extract solids include 30%–42% catechins, 5%–10% flavonols, and 2%–4% other flavonoids [13]. Catechins are divided into catechin (C), (−)-epicatechin (EC), (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC), and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). EGCG is the most abundant catechin and has been shown to have beneficial health effects on skin [12].


Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris
Major components of the tea polyphenol family.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384166&req=5

antioxidants-06-00002-f001: Major components of the tea polyphenol family.
Mentions: Tea is the second most consumed beverage worldwide and an important source of plant polyphenols in the human diet [12]. Camellia sinensis is the plant that gives rise to a variety of teas depending on specific processing of the plant [13]. Green tea is produced from fresh leaves in such a way that prevents oxidation of polyphenolic components (mainly catechins), oolong tea polyphenols are partially oxidized, while polyphenols in black tea undergo a high degree of oxidation [13]. Components of green tea beverage measured as weight percentage of extract solids include 30%–42% catechins, 5%–10% flavonols, and 2%–4% other flavonoids [13]. Catechins are divided into catechin (C), (−)-epicatechin (EC), (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC), and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). EGCG is the most abundant catechin and has been shown to have beneficial health effects on skin [12].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods including nuts, fruits, vegetables, chocolate, wine, and tea. Polyphenols have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Recent studies suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for reducing sebum production in the skin and for treatment of acne vulgaris. This review examines the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested tea polyphenols against sebum production and for acne treatment and prevention. The PubMed database was searched for studies on tea polyphenols, sebum secretion, and acne vulgaris. Of the 59 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. Two studies evaluated tea polyphenol effects on sebum production; six studies examined tea polyphenol effects on acne vulgaris. Seven studies evaluated topical tea polyphenols; one study examined systemic tea polyphenols. None of the studies evaluated both topical and systemic tea polyphenols. Tea polyphenol sources included green tea (six studies) and tea, type not specified (two studies). Overall, there is some evidence that tea polyphenols in topical formulation may be beneficial in reducing sebum secretion and in treatment of acne. Research studies of high quality and with large sample sizes are needed to assess the efficacy of tea polyphenols in topical and oral prevention of acne vulgaris and lipid synthesis by the sebaceous glands.

No MeSH data available.