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Reproducing the hierarchy of disorder for Morpho -inspired, broad-angle color reflection

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ABSTRACT

The scales of Morpho butterflies are covered with intricate, hierarchical ridge structures that produce a bright, blue reflection that remains stable across wide viewing angles. This effect has been researched extensively, and much understanding has been achieved using modeling that has focused on the positional disorder among the identical, multilayered ridges as the critical factor for producing angular independent color. Realizing such positional disorder of identical nanostructures is difficult, which in turn has limited experimental verification of different physical mechanisms that have been proposed. In this paper, we suggest an alternative model of inter-structural disorder that can achieve the same broad-angle color reflection, and is applicable to wafer-scale fabrication using conventional thin film technologies. Fabrication of a thin film that produces pure, stable blue across a viewing angle of more than 120 ° is demonstrated, together with a robust, conformal color coating.

No MeSH data available.


Images of Morpho Rhetenor.An optical microscope image (far left) and three scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly, showing the structure in increasing detail.
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f1: Images of Morpho Rhetenor.An optical microscope image (far left) and three scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly, showing the structure in increasing detail.

Mentions: We start by investigating the ridge structure of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly. A series of images at different scales is shown in Fig. 1. Several points are noteworthy. First, the ridges are not identical. Second, as the ridges are several micrometers tall, but with sub-micrometer widths, and taper to a point at the top, a well-defined “layer” is difficult to define. These observations clearly question the widely used model of an array of identical multilayered ridges.


Reproducing the hierarchy of disorder for Morpho -inspired, broad-angle color reflection
Images of Morpho Rhetenor.An optical microscope image (far left) and three scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly, showing the structure in increasing detail.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384085&req=5

f1: Images of Morpho Rhetenor.An optical microscope image (far left) and three scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly, showing the structure in increasing detail.
Mentions: We start by investigating the ridge structure of a Morpho Rhetenor butterfly. A series of images at different scales is shown in Fig. 1. Several points are noteworthy. First, the ridges are not identical. Second, as the ridges are several micrometers tall, but with sub-micrometer widths, and taper to a point at the top, a well-defined “layer” is difficult to define. These observations clearly question the widely used model of an array of identical multilayered ridges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The scales of Morpho butterflies are covered with intricate, hierarchical ridge structures that produce a bright, blue reflection that remains stable across wide viewing angles. This effect has been researched extensively, and much understanding has been achieved using modeling that has focused on the positional disorder among the identical, multilayered ridges as the critical factor for producing angular independent color. Realizing such positional disorder of identical nanostructures is difficult, which in turn has limited experimental verification of different physical mechanisms that have been proposed. In this paper, we suggest an alternative model of inter-structural disorder that can achieve the same broad-angle color reflection, and is applicable to wafer-scale fabrication using conventional thin film technologies. Fabrication of a thin film that produces pure, stable blue across a viewing angle of more than 120 ° is demonstrated, together with a robust, conformal color coating.

No MeSH data available.