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Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Each box plot shows the muscle activation (as percentage of maximum voluntary contraction) during exercise. Whiskers indicate variability outside the upper and lower quartiles.
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j_hukin-2017-0023_fig_003: Each box plot shows the muscle activation (as percentage of maximum voluntary contraction) during exercise. Whiskers indicate variability outside the upper and lower quartiles.

Mentions: All participants managed to complete each exercise trial and thus, were included in the data analysis. Figure 3 shows the box plots of the activation values (% of MVC) of each muscle during the four exercises. Muscle activation (Median, IR) expressed as percentage values of ARV normalized to MVCs is reported in Table 1.


Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises
Each box plot shows the muscle activation (as percentage of maximum voluntary contraction) during exercise. Whiskers indicate variability outside the upper and lower quartiles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384053&req=5

j_hukin-2017-0023_fig_003: Each box plot shows the muscle activation (as percentage of maximum voluntary contraction) during exercise. Whiskers indicate variability outside the upper and lower quartiles.
Mentions: All participants managed to complete each exercise trial and thus, were included in the data analysis. Figure 3 shows the box plots of the activation values (% of MVC) of each muscle during the four exercises. Muscle activation (Median, IR) expressed as percentage values of ARV normalized to MVCs is reported in Table 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus