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Muscle Force-Velocity Relationships Observed in Four Different Functional Tests

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aims of the present study were to investigate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationships observed in different functional movement tests and explore the parameters depicting force, velocity and power producing capacities of the tested muscles. Twelve subjects were tested on maximum performance in vertical jumps, cycling, bench press throws, and bench pulls performed against different loads. Thereafter, both the averaged and maximum force and velocity variables recorded from individual trials were used for force–velocity relationship modeling. The observed individual force-velocity relationships were exceptionally strong (median correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.930 to r = 0.995) and approximately linear independently of the test and variable type. Most of the relationship parameters observed from the averaged and maximum force and velocity variable types were strongly related in all tests (r = 0.789-0.991), except for those in vertical jumps (r = 0.485-0.930). However, the generalizability of the force-velocity relationship parameters depicting maximum force, velocity and power of the tested muscles across different tests was inconsistent and on average moderate. We concluded that the linear force-velocity relationship model based on either maximum or averaged force-velocity data could provide the outcomes depicting force, velocity and power generating capacity of the tested muscles, although such outcomes can only be partially generalized across different muscles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation coefficients between the same F-V regression parameters observed in the averaged and maximum F and V variable types in each of 4 tests (*p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01)
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j_hukin-2017-0021_fig_003: Correlation coefficients between the same F-V regression parameters observed in the averaged and maximum F and V variable types in each of 4 tests (*p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01)

Mentions: Figure 3 depicts the relationships between the same parameters of the individual linear F-V regression models observed in the maximum and averaged F and V variable types obtained from individual tests. The relationships appeared to be mainly strong and significant for all parameters except for P0 observed in CMJ.Figure 3


Muscle Force-Velocity Relationships Observed in Four Different Functional Tests
Correlation coefficients between the same F-V regression parameters observed in the averaged and maximum F and V variable types in each of 4 tests (*p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384051&req=5

j_hukin-2017-0021_fig_003: Correlation coefficients between the same F-V regression parameters observed in the averaged and maximum F and V variable types in each of 4 tests (*p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01)
Mentions: Figure 3 depicts the relationships between the same parameters of the individual linear F-V regression models observed in the maximum and averaged F and V variable types obtained from individual tests. The relationships appeared to be mainly strong and significant for all parameters except for P0 observed in CMJ.Figure 3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aims of the present study were to investigate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationships observed in different functional movement tests and explore the parameters depicting force, velocity and power producing capacities of the tested muscles. Twelve subjects were tested on maximum performance in vertical jumps, cycling, bench press throws, and bench pulls performed against different loads. Thereafter, both the averaged and maximum force and velocity variables recorded from individual trials were used for force&ndash;velocity relationship modeling. The observed individual force-velocity relationships were exceptionally strong (median correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.930 to r = 0.995) and approximately linear independently of the test and variable type. Most of the relationship parameters observed from the averaged and maximum force and velocity variable types were strongly related in all tests (r = 0.789-0.991), except for those in vertical jumps (r = 0.485-0.930). However, the generalizability of the force-velocity relationship parameters depicting maximum force, velocity and power of the tested muscles across different tests was inconsistent and on average moderate. We concluded that the linear force-velocity relationship model based on either maximum or averaged force-velocity data could provide the outcomes depicting force, velocity and power generating capacity of the tested muscles, although such outcomes can only be partially generalized across different muscles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus