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Changes in Impact Signals and Muscle Activity in Response to Different Shoe and Landing Conditions

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Few rigorous scientific studies have investigated how the corresponding neuromuscular activity in the lower extremity occurs during different landing control movements in response to different impact signals. This study aimed to determine the potential shoe effects on impact signals, neuromuscular responses and their possible interactions in different human landing movements. Twelve male basketball players were required to wear high-cushioned basketball shoes (BS) and minimally cushioned control shoes (CC) to perform active drop jump landings (DJL) and passive landings (PL). Ground reaction forces and EMG amplitude (root mean square, EMGRMS) of the leg muscles within 50 ms before and after the landing movements were collected simultaneously. No shoe effect was found on the characteristics of impact signals and neuromuscular activity during the contact phase of DJL. By contrast, for PL, the values of maximal ground reaction force and the peak loading rate were evidently lower in the BS condition than in the CC condition (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the EMGRMS of all muscles demonstrated a significant decrease in the BS condition compared with the CC condition within 50 ms after contact (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that under the condition in which related muscles are activated improperly, a neuromuscular adaptation occurs in response to different impact signals.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of post-activation of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) between the basketball shoe (BS) and the control shoe (CC) in drop jump landing and passive landing tasks.
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j_hukin-2017-0018_fig_004: Comparison of post-activation of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) between the basketball shoe (BS) and the control shoe (CC) in drop jump landing and passive landing tasks.

Mentions: No significant interaction was found for post-activation of the EMG amplitude between the shoe type and drop height. On average, no significant differences in EMGRMS were observed for any of the tested muscles during the post-activation phase of DJL (Figure 3b). However, for PL, the shoe factor proved to be the most relevant factor (p < 0.05) to the changes in the EMG amplitude variable (Table 2). Specifically, the EMGRMS of RF, BF, TA and LG indicated a significant decrease in the BS condition compared with the CC condition from at least one drop height (p < 0.05) (Figure 3b). Furthermore, the post hoc comparisons demonstrated that post-activation of EMGRMS in the BS condition was significantly lower than that in the CC condition for TA at all landing heights, for LG at PL30 and PL45, for RF at PL60, and for BF at PL45 and PL60, respectively (Figure 3b).


Changes in Impact Signals and Muscle Activity in Response to Different Shoe and Landing Conditions
Comparison of post-activation of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) between the basketball shoe (BS) and the control shoe (CC) in drop jump landing and passive landing tasks.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384048&req=5

j_hukin-2017-0018_fig_004: Comparison of post-activation of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) between the basketball shoe (BS) and the control shoe (CC) in drop jump landing and passive landing tasks.
Mentions: No significant interaction was found for post-activation of the EMG amplitude between the shoe type and drop height. On average, no significant differences in EMGRMS were observed for any of the tested muscles during the post-activation phase of DJL (Figure 3b). However, for PL, the shoe factor proved to be the most relevant factor (p < 0.05) to the changes in the EMG amplitude variable (Table 2). Specifically, the EMGRMS of RF, BF, TA and LG indicated a significant decrease in the BS condition compared with the CC condition from at least one drop height (p < 0.05) (Figure 3b). Furthermore, the post hoc comparisons demonstrated that post-activation of EMGRMS in the BS condition was significantly lower than that in the CC condition for TA at all landing heights, for LG at PL30 and PL45, for RF at PL60, and for BF at PL45 and PL60, respectively (Figure 3b).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Few rigorous scientific studies have investigated how the corresponding neuromuscular activity in the lower extremity occurs during different landing control movements in response to different impact signals. This study aimed to determine the potential shoe effects on impact signals, neuromuscular responses and their possible interactions in different human landing movements. Twelve male basketball players were required to wear high-cushioned basketball shoes (BS) and minimally cushioned control shoes (CC) to perform active drop jump landings (DJL) and passive landings (PL). Ground reaction forces and EMG amplitude (root mean square, EMGRMS) of the leg muscles within 50 ms before and after the landing movements were collected simultaneously. No shoe effect was found on the characteristics of impact signals and neuromuscular activity during the contact phase of DJL. By contrast, for PL, the values of maximal ground reaction force and the peak loading rate were evidently lower in the BS condition than in the CC condition (p &lt; 0.05). Meanwhile, the EMGRMS of all muscles demonstrated a significant decrease in the BS condition compared with the CC condition within 50 ms after contact (p &lt; 0.05). These findings suggest that under the condition in which related muscles are activated improperly, a neuromuscular adaptation occurs in response to different impact signals.

No MeSH data available.