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Magnesium Ethylenediamine Borohydride as Solid-State Electrolyte for Magnesium Batteries

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ABSTRACT

Solid-state magnesium ion conductors with exceptionally high ionic conductivity at low temperatures, 5 × 10−8 Scm−1 at 30 °C and 6 × 10−5 Scm−1 at 70 °C, are prepared by mechanochemical reaction of magnesium borohydride and ethylenediamine. The coordination complexes are crystalline, support cycling in a potential window of 1.2 V, and allow magnesium plating/stripping. While the electrochemical stability, limited by the ethylenediamine ligand, must be improved to reach competitive energy densities, our results demonstrate that partially chelated Mg2+ complexes represent a promising platform for the development of an all-solid-state magnesium battery.

No MeSH data available.


Cyclic voltammogram of a Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C at a scan rate of 10 mVs−1. Inset: Mg stripping charge (=area of the Mg stripping peak) vs. cycle number.
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f3: Cyclic voltammogram of a Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C at a scan rate of 10 mVs−1. Inset: Mg stripping charge (=area of the Mg stripping peak) vs. cycle number.

Mentions: High ionic conductivity is only one of the requirements for an electrolyte for Mg batteries. To test the stability and to confirm that the observed conductivity stems from the transport of Mg ions, cyclic voltammetry measurements were conducted on an asymmetric Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C, as shown in Fig. 3. At −0.2 V vs. the Mg counter electrode, we observe the onset of cathodic current corresponding to Mg plating onto the Pt working electrode. The anodic current during the reverse sweep between −0.2 V and 0.5 V is attributed to Mg stripping, strongly indicating that Mg conduction indeed takes place.


Magnesium Ethylenediamine Borohydride as Solid-State Electrolyte for Magnesium Batteries
Cyclic voltammogram of a Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C at a scan rate of 10 mVs−1. Inset: Mg stripping charge (=area of the Mg stripping peak) vs. cycle number.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5384009&req=5

f3: Cyclic voltammogram of a Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C at a scan rate of 10 mVs−1. Inset: Mg stripping charge (=area of the Mg stripping peak) vs. cycle number.
Mentions: High ionic conductivity is only one of the requirements for an electrolyte for Mg batteries. To test the stability and to confirm that the observed conductivity stems from the transport of Mg ions, cyclic voltammetry measurements were conducted on an asymmetric Pt/Mg(en)1(BH4)2/Mg cell at 60 °C, as shown in Fig. 3. At −0.2 V vs. the Mg counter electrode, we observe the onset of cathodic current corresponding to Mg plating onto the Pt working electrode. The anodic current during the reverse sweep between −0.2 V and 0.5 V is attributed to Mg stripping, strongly indicating that Mg conduction indeed takes place.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Solid-state magnesium ion conductors with exceptionally high ionic conductivity at low temperatures, 5 × 10−8 Scm−1 at 30 °C and 6 × 10−5 Scm−1 at 70 °C, are prepared by mechanochemical reaction of magnesium borohydride and ethylenediamine. The coordination complexes are crystalline, support cycling in a potential window of 1.2 V, and allow magnesium plating/stripping. While the electrochemical stability, limited by the ethylenediamine ligand, must be improved to reach competitive energy densities, our results demonstrate that partially chelated Mg2+ complexes represent a promising platform for the development of an all-solid-state magnesium battery.

No MeSH data available.