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Effect of traditional Chinese medicine formula Sinisan on chronic restraint stress-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a rat study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents one of the most common forms of liver disease worldwide, and it is always regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle, sitting for an extended time, and a low physical activity level, which often coincide with chronic and long-lasting psychological stress. A Chinese medicine Sinisan (SNS) may be a potential formula for treating this kind of disease.

Methods: In this study, a long-term chronic restraint stress protocol was used to investigate the mechanism underlying stress-induced NALFD. To investigate the effect of SNS treatment on stress-induced NAFLD, we measured the liver and serum values of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), liver free fatty acids (FFA), low-density lipoprotein, superoxide dismutase, tumor necrosis factor-α, malondialdehyde, interleukin (IL)-6, and serum values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase. Results are shown as a mean ± standard deviation. Significant differences between the groups were evaluated using the Student t-test. For multiple comparisons, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. If the results of ANOVA indicated significant differences, post hoc analysis was performed with the Tukey test or Dunnett test, and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Long-term chronic stress led to steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Additionally, SNS treatment significantly increased body weight gain (p < 0.01) and sucrose preference (p < 0.001), and it reduced the liver values of TC, TG, and FFA (p < 0.05). SNS also reduced the serum values of AST and ALT (p < 0.001), and the liver value of IL-6 (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: This study’s results demonstrate that psychological stress may be a significant risk factor of NAFLD. Furthermore, the traditional Chinese medicine formula SNS may have some beneficial effect in antagonizing psychological stress and stress-related NAFLD.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in behavioral indicators after the chronic restraint stress (CRS) procedure and Sinisan (SNS) treatment. a Body weight (BW) changes after CRS. b The sucrose preference after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. c, d Open-field test indexes (the number of locomotor and rearing events) after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. Values plotted are mean ± standard deviation (N = 10 per group). #p < 0.05, ##p < 0.01, ### p < 0.001 versus the control group, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001 versus the stress group
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Fig2: Changes in behavioral indicators after the chronic restraint stress (CRS) procedure and Sinisan (SNS) treatment. a Body weight (BW) changes after CRS. b The sucrose preference after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. c, d Open-field test indexes (the number of locomotor and rearing events) after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. Values plotted are mean ± standard deviation (N = 10 per group). #p < 0.05, ##p < 0.01, ### p < 0.001 versus the control group, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001 versus the stress group

Mentions: At the end of the experimental protocol, body weight gain was significantly lower in the stress group than in the control group (p < 0.001), and the SNS group had a higher body weight gain than the stress group (p < 0.01) (Fig. 2a). The sucrose preference was lower in the stress group than in the control group (p < 0.001), and the sucrose preference was higher in the SNS group than in the stress group (p < 0.001) (Fig. 2b). The numbers of locomotor (p < 0.001) and rearing (p < 0.01) events in the OFT were significantly lower in the stress group than in the control group; however, there was no significant difference between the stress group and SNS group (Fig. 2c, d).Fig. 2


Effect of traditional Chinese medicine formula Sinisan on chronic restraint stress-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a rat study
Changes in behavioral indicators after the chronic restraint stress (CRS) procedure and Sinisan (SNS) treatment. a Body weight (BW) changes after CRS. b The sucrose preference after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. c, d Open-field test indexes (the number of locomotor and rearing events) after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. Values plotted are mean ± standard deviation (N = 10 per group). #p < 0.05, ##p < 0.01, ### p < 0.001 versus the control group, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001 versus the stress group
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383977&req=5

Fig2: Changes in behavioral indicators after the chronic restraint stress (CRS) procedure and Sinisan (SNS) treatment. a Body weight (BW) changes after CRS. b The sucrose preference after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. c, d Open-field test indexes (the number of locomotor and rearing events) after the CRS procedure and SNS treatment. Values plotted are mean ± standard deviation (N = 10 per group). #p < 0.05, ##p < 0.01, ### p < 0.001 versus the control group, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001 versus the stress group
Mentions: At the end of the experimental protocol, body weight gain was significantly lower in the stress group than in the control group (p < 0.001), and the SNS group had a higher body weight gain than the stress group (p < 0.01) (Fig. 2a). The sucrose preference was lower in the stress group than in the control group (p < 0.001), and the sucrose preference was higher in the SNS group than in the stress group (p < 0.001) (Fig. 2b). The numbers of locomotor (p < 0.001) and rearing (p < 0.01) events in the OFT were significantly lower in the stress group than in the control group; however, there was no significant difference between the stress group and SNS group (Fig. 2c, d).Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents one of the most common forms of liver disease worldwide, and it is always regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle, sitting for an extended time, and a low physical activity level, which often coincide with chronic and long-lasting psychological stress. A Chinese medicine Sinisan (SNS) may be a potential formula for treating this kind of disease.

Methods: In this study, a long-term chronic restraint stress protocol was used to investigate the mechanism underlying stress-induced NALFD. To investigate the effect of SNS treatment on stress-induced NAFLD, we measured the liver and serum values of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), liver free fatty acids (FFA), low-density lipoprotein, superoxide dismutase, tumor necrosis factor-&alpha;, malondialdehyde, interleukin (IL)-6, and serum values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase. Results are shown as a mean&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;standard deviation. Significant differences between the groups were evaluated using the Student t-test. For multiple comparisons, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. If the results of ANOVA indicated significant differences, post hoc analysis was performed with the Tukey test or Dunnett test, and p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Long-term chronic stress led to steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Additionally, SNS treatment significantly increased body weight gain (p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.01) and sucrose preference (p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.001), and it reduced the liver values of TC, TG, and FFA (p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.05). SNS also reduced the serum values of AST and ALT (p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.001), and the liver value of IL-6 (p&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;0.01).

Conclusions: This study&rsquo;s results demonstrate that psychological stress may be a significant risk factor of NAFLD. Furthermore, the traditional Chinese medicine formula SNS may have some beneficial effect in antagonizing psychological stress and stress-related NAFLD.

No MeSH data available.