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Bioinspired polymer microstructures for directional transport of oily liquids

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Nature has always served as an inspiration for scientists, helping them to solve a large diversity of technical problems. In our case, we are interested in the directional transport of oily liquids and as a model for this application we used the flat bug Dysodius lunatus. In this report, we present arrays of drops looking like polymer microstructures produced by the two-photon polymerization technique that mimic the micro-ornamentation from the bug's cuticle. A good directionality of oil transport was achieved, directly controlled by the direction of the pointed microstructures at the surface. If the tips of the drop-like microstructures are pointing towards the left side, the liquid front moves to the right and vice versa. Similar effects could be expected for the transport of oily lubricants. These results could, therefore, be interesting for applications in friction and wear reduction.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist and the reaction schemes of the main steps of the photo-induced polymerization chain reaction.
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RSOS160849F3: Chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist and the reaction schemes of the main steps of the photo-induced polymerization chain reaction.

Mentions: As a photoresist, an (80/20) mixture of two (meth)acrylate monomers, pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA, Sigma-Aldrich) and bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA, Esschem Europe Ltd, Durham, UK), was used. To this mixture 2 wt% Irgacure 819 (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany) was added—an efficient photosensitive initiator of the radical polymerization chain reaction in acryl-based compounds. To assure a better mixing of the components and a good fluidity of the final photoresist, 150 ml of propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) was added, and the whole mixture was magnetically stirred for 3 h. The chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist are shown on the left side of figure 3.Figure 3.


Bioinspired polymer microstructures for directional transport of oily liquids
Chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist and the reaction schemes of the main steps of the photo-induced polymerization chain reaction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383830&req=5

RSOS160849F3: Chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist and the reaction schemes of the main steps of the photo-induced polymerization chain reaction.
Mentions: As a photoresist, an (80/20) mixture of two (meth)acrylate monomers, pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA, Sigma-Aldrich) and bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA, Esschem Europe Ltd, Durham, UK), was used. To this mixture 2 wt% Irgacure 819 (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany) was added—an efficient photosensitive initiator of the radical polymerization chain reaction in acryl-based compounds. To assure a better mixing of the components and a good fluidity of the final photoresist, 150 ml of propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) was added, and the whole mixture was magnetically stirred for 3 h. The chemical formulae of the constituents of the photoresist are shown on the left side of figure 3.Figure 3.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Nature has always served as an inspiration for scientists, helping them to solve a large diversity of technical problems. In our case, we are interested in the directional transport of oily liquids and as a model for this application we used the flat bug Dysodius lunatus. In this report, we present arrays of drops looking like polymer microstructures produced by the two-photon polymerization technique that mimic the micro-ornamentation from the bug's cuticle. A good directionality of oil transport was achieved, directly controlled by the direction of the pointed microstructures at the surface. If the tips of the drop-like microstructures are pointing towards the left side, the liquid front moves to the right and vice versa. Similar effects could be expected for the transport of oily lubricants. These results could, therefore, be interesting for applications in friction and wear reduction.

No MeSH data available.