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Age-related normative values for handgrip strength and grip strength ’ s usefulness as a predictor of mortality and both cognitive and physical decline in older adults in northwest Russia

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: This paper sought to provide normative values for grip strength among older adults across different age groups in northwest Russia and to investigate their predictive value for adverse events.

Methods:: A population-based prospective cohort study of 611 community-dwelling individuals 65+. Grip strength was measured using the standard protocol applied in the Groningen Elderly Tests. The cut-off thresholds for grip strength were defined separately for men and women of different ages using a weighted polynomial regression. A Cox regression analysis, the c-statistic, a risk reclassification analysis, and bootstrapping techniques were used to analyze the data. The outcomes were the 5-year mortality rate, the loss of autonomy and mental decline.

Results:: We determined the age-related reference intervals of grip strength for older adults. The 5th and 10th percentiles of grip strength were associated with a higher risk for malnutrition, low autonomy, physical and mental functioning and 5-year mortality. The 5th percentile of grip strength was associated with a decline in autonomy.

Conclusions:: This study presents age- and sex-specific reference values for grip strength in the 65+ Russian population derived from a prospective cohort study. The norms can be used in clinical practice to identify patients at increased risk for adverse outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Linear regression for the average grip strength and the maximum grip strength of DK-50 dynamometer and JAMAR® Plus dynamometer.
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Figure 4: Linear regression for the average grip strength and the maximum grip strength of DK-50 dynamometer and JAMAR® Plus dynamometer.

Mentions: Linear regression was used to model the relationship between measurements of the two dynamometers. Intercept A for AGS between the two methods was 1.79 (95%CI: -0.93 to 4.50), for MGS - 1.77 (95% CI: -1.09 to 4.63) (Figure 4).


Age-related normative values for handgrip strength and grip strength ’ s usefulness as a predictor of mortality and both cognitive and physical decline in older adults in northwest Russia
Linear regression for the average grip strength and the maximum grip strength of DK-50 dynamometer and JAMAR® Plus dynamometer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383770&req=5

Figure 4: Linear regression for the average grip strength and the maximum grip strength of DK-50 dynamometer and JAMAR® Plus dynamometer.
Mentions: Linear regression was used to model the relationship between measurements of the two dynamometers. Intercept A for AGS between the two methods was 1.79 (95%CI: -0.93 to 4.50), for MGS - 1.77 (95% CI: -1.09 to 4.63) (Figure 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: This paper sought to provide normative values for grip strength among older adults across different age groups in northwest Russia and to investigate their predictive value for adverse events.

Methods:: A population-based prospective cohort study of 611 community-dwelling individuals 65+. Grip strength was measured using the standard protocol applied in the Groningen Elderly Tests. The cut-off thresholds for grip strength were defined separately for men and women of different ages using a weighted polynomial regression. A Cox regression analysis, the c-statistic, a risk reclassification analysis, and bootstrapping techniques were used to analyze the data. The outcomes were the 5-year mortality rate, the loss of autonomy and mental decline.

Results:: We determined the age-related reference intervals of grip strength for older adults. The 5th and 10th percentiles of grip strength were associated with a higher risk for malnutrition, low autonomy, physical and mental functioning and 5-year mortality. The 5th percentile of grip strength was associated with a decline in autonomy.

Conclusions:: This study presents age- and sex-specific reference values for grip strength in the 65+ Russian population derived from a prospective cohort study. The norms can be used in clinical practice to identify patients at increased risk for adverse outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus